Preempting the Holocaust

Paperback | April 10, 2000

byLawrence L. Langer

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Lawrence L. Langer here explores the use of Holocaust themes in literature, memoirs, film, and painting, examining the work of such authors as Primo Levi, Elie Wiesel, Cynthia Ozick, Art Spiegelman, and Simon Wiesenthal, and appraising the art of Samuel Bak, the Holocaust Project by Judy Chicago, and the Yiddish film Undzere Kinder, made in Poland after the war.

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Included among the Los Angeles Times Best Nonfiction Books in its 1998 annual book review, Lawrence L. Langer’s examination of the use of Holocaust themes in film, literature, art and memoirs provides a through-provoking perspective on the most profound implications of its occurrence. Enhanced by more than 15 evocative illustration...

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Lawrence L. Langer here explores the use of Holocaust themes in literature, memoirs, film, and painting, examining the work of such authors as Primo Levi, Elie Wiesel, Cynthia Ozick, Art Spiegelman, and Simon Wiesenthal, and appraising the art of Samuel Bak, the Holocaust Project by Judy Chicago, and the Yiddish film Undzere Kinder, ma...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.13 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:April 10, 2000Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300082681

ISBN - 13:9780300082685

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From Our Editors

Included among the Los Angeles Times Best Nonfiction Books in its 1998 annual book review, Lawrence L. Langer’s examination of the use of Holocaust themes in film, literature, art and memoirs provides a through-provoking perspective on the most profound implications of its occurrence. Enhanced by more than 15 evocative illustrations, Preempting the Holocaust discusses the work of Samuel Bak, Judy Chicago’s Holocaust Project and the Polish-Yiddish post-war film Undzere Kinder, as well as the writings of Wiesenthal, Wiesel, Spiegelman and Levi, to offer a thought-provoking perspective unparalleled in the ranks of Holocaust studies.