Presidential Addresses And State Papers (volume 20)

Paperback | January 8, 2012

byTheodore Roosevelt

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1910. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... the Sudan, and to bid the authorities and the people in England not to falter or to doubt the beneficence of their established methods for insuring peace and prosperity in regions wholly incapable of governing themselves.--The Editor. I thank you heartily for myself. I thank you still more because I know what you have done is to be taken primarily as a sign of the respect and friendly good-will which, more and more as time goes by, tend to knit together the English-speaking peoples. I shall not try to make any extended address of mere thanks and still less one of mere eulogy. I prefer to speak--and I know you would prefer to have me speak--on matters of real concern to you as to which I happen at this moment to possess some first-hand knowledge, having recently traversed certain portions of the British Empire under conditions which made me intimately cognizant of their circumstances and needs. I have just spent nearly a year in Africa. While there I saw four British protectorates. I grew heartily to respect the men I met there--settlers and military and civil officials--and it seems to me that the best acknowledgment I can render you for what you have done for me--the best service that I can render both to you and to them--is very briefly to tell you how I was impressed by some things I saw. Your men in Africa are doing a great work for your Empire, and they are also doing a great work for civilization. This fact, and my sympathy for and belief in them, are my reasons for speaking. People at home, whether in Europe or in America, people who live softly, often fail fully to realize what is being done for them by the men who are actually engaged in the pioneer work of civilization abroad. Of course, in any mass of men there are some who are weak or unwort...

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text, images, or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1910. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... the Sudan, and to bid the authorities and the people in England not to falter or to doubt the beneficence of their establish...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:128 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.27 inPublished:January 8, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217790747

ISBN - 13:9780217790741

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