Press Censorship in Elizabethan England: PR CENSORSHIP IN ELIZABETHAN E by Cyndia Susan CleggPress Censorship in Elizabethan England: PR CENSORSHIP IN ELIZABETHAN E by Cyndia Susan Clegg

Press Censorship in Elizabethan England: PR CENSORSHIP IN ELIZABETHAN E

byCyndia Susan Clegg

Paperback | September 4, 2004

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This is a revisionist history of press censorship in the rapidly expanding print culture of the sixteenth century. Clegg establishes the nature and source of the controls, and evaluates their means and effectiveness. By considering the literary and bibliographical evidence of books that were censored, and placing them in the literary, religious, economic and political culture of the time, Clegg concludes that press control was neither a routine nor a consistent mechanism. The book will become the standard reference work on Elizabethan press censorship.
Title:Press Censorship in Elizabethan England: PR CENSORSHIP IN ELIZABETHAN EFormat:PaperbackDimensions:316 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:September 4, 2004Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521545862

ISBN - 13:9780521545860

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Table of Contents

Part I. The Practice of Censorship: 1. Privilege, license, and authority: the Crown and the press; 2. Elizabethan press controls; 3. Elizabethan censorship proclamations; Part II. Censored Texts: 4. Catholic propagandists; 5. George Gascoigne and the rhetoric of censorship; 6. John Stubbs's The Discovery of a Gaping Gulf and realpolitik; 7. The review and reform of Holinshed's Chronicles; 8. Martin Marprelate and the puritan press; 9. The 1599 bishops' ban; 10. Conclusion.

Editorial Reviews

"Clegg's familiarity with a range of English literatures dovetails nicely with her knack for historical narrative. This attention to individual cases fills the balance of her book and makes for absorbing reading." H-Net: Humanities and Social Sciences Online