Principles of Distributed Systems: 9th International Conference, Opodis 2005, Pisa, Italy, December 12-14, 2005, Revised Selected Paper by James H. AndersonPrinciples of Distributed Systems: 9th International Conference, Opodis 2005, Pisa, Italy, December 12-14, 2005, Revised Selected Paper by James H. Anderson

Principles of Distributed Systems: 9th International Conference, Opodis 2005, Pisa, Italy, December…

byJames H. AndersonEditorGiuseppe Prencipe, Roger Wattenhofer

Paperback | December 22, 2006

Pricing and Purchase Info

$148.02 online 
$178.50 list price save 17%
Earn 740 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

This book constitutes the refereed post-proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems, OPODIS 2005, held in Pisa, Italy in December 2005. The volume presents 30 revised full papers and abstracts of 2 invited talks. The papers are organized in topical sections on nonblocking synchronization, fault-tolerant broadcast and consensus, self-stabilizing systems, peer-to-peer systems and collaborative environments, sensor networks and mobile computing, security and verification, real-time systems, and peer-to-peer systems.

Title:Principles of Distributed Systems: 9th International Conference, Opodis 2005, Pisa, Italy, December…Format:PaperbackDimensions:448 pages, 23.5 × 15.5 × 0.07 inPublished:December 22, 2006Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:3540363211

ISBN - 13:9783540363217

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Table of Contents

Invited Talk 1.- Distributed Algorithms for Systems of Autonomous Mobile Robots.- Invited Talk 2.- Real-Time Issues in Mobile Wireless Networks.- Session 1: Nonblocking Synchronization.- A Lazy Concurrent List-Based Set Algorithm.- Efficiently Implementing a Large Number of LL/SC Objects.- Can Memory Be Used Adaptively by Uniform Algorithms?.- Randomized Wait-Free Consensus Using an Atomicity Assumption.- Session 2: Fault-Tolerant Broadcast and Consensus.- Optimal Randomized Fair Exchange with Secret Shared Coins.- Two Abstractions for Implementing Atomic Objects in Dynamic Systems.- Parsimonious Asynchronous Byzantine-Fault-Tolerant Atomic Broadcast.- Session 3: Self-stabilizing Systems.- Self-stabilizing Population Protocols.- A Self-stabilizing Link-Coloring Protocol Resilient to Unbounded Byzantine Faults in Arbitrary Networks.- Timed Virtual Stationary Automata for Mobile Networks.- Asynchronous and Fully Self-stabilizing Time-Adaptive Majority Consensus.- Session 4: Peer-to-Peer Systems and Collaborative Environments.- Stable Predicate Detection in Dynamic Systems.- MTcast: Robust and Efficient P2P-Based Video Delivery for Heterogeneous Users.- Towards a Theory of Self-organization.- Node Discovery in Networks.- Session 5: Sensor Networks and Mobile Computing.- Optimal Clock Synchronization Under Energy Constraints in Wireless Ad-Hoc Networks.- Half-Space Proximal: A New Local Test for Extracting a Bounded Dilation Spanner of a Unit Disk Graph.- A State-Based Model of Sensor Protocols.- Session 6: Security and Verification.- Approximation Bounds for Black Hole Search Problems.- Revising UNITY Programs: Possibilities and Limitations.- Session 7: Real-Time Systems.- The Partitioned, Static-Priority Scheduling of Sporadic Real-Time Tasks with Constrained Deadlines on Multiprocessor Platforms.- New Schedulability Tests for Real-Time Task Sets Scheduled by Deadline Monotonic on Multiprocessors.- Static-Priority Scheduling of Sporadic Messages on a Wireless Channel.- Implementing Reliable Distributed Real-Time Systems with the ?-Model.- Session 8: Peer-to-Peer Systems.- Reconfigurable Distributed Storage for Dynamic Networks.- Skip B-Trees.- Bounding Communication Cost in Dynamic Load Balancing of Distributed Hash Tables.- Session 9: Sensor Networks and Mobile Computing.- On the Power of Anonymous One-Way Communication.- Quality-Aware Resource Management for Wireless Sensor Networks.- Topology Control with Limited Geometric Information.