Prisoner Of Tehran: A Memoir by Marina Nemat

Prisoner Of Tehran: A Memoir

byMarina Nemat

Kobo ebook | April 8, 2008

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about

In 1982, 16-year-old Marina Nemat was arrested on false charges by Iranian Revolutionary Guards and tortured in Tehran's notorious Evin prison. At a time when most Western teenaged girls are choosing their prom dresses, Nemat was having her feet beaten by men with cables and listening to gunshots as her friends were being executed. She survived only because one of the guards fell in love with her and threatened to harm her family if she refused to marry him. Soon after her forced conversion to Islam and marriage, her husband was assassinated by rival factions. Nemat was returned to prison but, ironically, it was her captor's family who eventually secured her release. An extraordinary tale of faith and survival, Prisoner of Tehran is a testament to the power of love in the face of evil and injustice.

Heather's Review

Stories which quietly reveal incredible, almost unfathomable courage always draw me in. Prisoner of Tehran is one such story. It is the personal journey of Marina Nemat, an Iranian woman whose life experiences could hardly be imagined. When the story opens, Marina is sixteen. The Iranian Revolution has just occurred ushering in, amon...

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Title:Prisoner Of Tehran: A MemoirFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:April 8, 2008Publisher:Penguin CanadaLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0143179209

ISBN - 13:9780143179207

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from GREAT Highly recommended, a great read about overcoming injustices
Date published: 2017-10-31
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Must Read Book! My mom had bought this book and I found it lying around in the house a few years later. I am so happy to have found this book, it was absolutely amazing to read, it made me feel so attached and like I knew the people personally. This book is a really good read, highly recommended, it really opens your eyes to the world to both its injustices and miracles.
Date published: 2017-10-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ok A great novel with clever, easy to follow writing with funny and witty characters. Definitely a must read!
Date published: 2017-09-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Inspiring inspiring story and opens your eyes
Date published: 2017-08-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from a must read! To be honest, my sister owned this book as a gift from a college friend. With an urge for a new Genre, I picked this up and I am glad I did. This book is absolutely amazing on so many levels and heart wrenching at the same time. I learned that the author is now Canadian and have moved on to read her next book which is equally as amazing as this one!
Date published: 2017-07-31
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great read! I bought this book because sometimes it is nice to read a true story. The book draws at you heart strings and shows how brave the prisoners were.
Date published: 2017-07-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very Good Yet another book showing the strength of a woman! This woman went through so much but she's here, telling her story and bringing awareness.
Date published: 2017-07-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Captivating! Unbelievable story, such a great read!
Date published: 2017-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Captivating! A captivating insight into a world very far from my own. Unlike other memoirs this reads like a fiction! You'll be hooked in the first chapter! It provided a lot of support and similarities to experiences of living in Tehran from others.
Date published: 2017-06-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great find! I will never forget this book. Great story
Date published: 2017-06-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heart-Wrenching and Memorable *4.5 star rating* Prisoner of Tehran is one of those books that I will just never forget. I read it A LONG time ago (not kidding; it was November 2016) but it is so raw that I feel like I just read it last night. This was one of my English class' required reads, and I expected to like it less because (A) I watched a movie about someone escaping Iran, which was AMAZING, but I didn't want to experience the same kind of storyline again and (B) the cover is definitely not the prettiest. Nevertheless, I adored it and I couldn't wait for all of my friends who had English class after me to pick it up and enjoy it as much as I did. Marina Nemat is a lovely writer who writes like she experienced all of this not too long ago. It has been quite a while, but you can feel the pain and sorrow in every word she writes. I actually was fortunate to "meet" Marina (she came to speak at our school) and it was a perfect experience since I can hear the thoughts of the brilliant author who changed my life. Everything she told us was life-changing. She spoke about inclusion and diversity, and how we (this generation) are the key-life-changers of the world. When she spoke, she made it seem like we are able to conquer anything. It was amazing to see her in real life and (sadly) see how affected she still is after all of her traumatizing experiences in Iran. Prisoner of Tehran starts off pretty normally. We readers feel the tension because we know that there are going to be (many) rough moments throughout this story, but we first learn about Marina's life before the Islamic Revolution... before things changed and got her into prison. I'm going to make a generalization here: we constantly think that people who take big risks in life are only in the movies, or are one of a kind and come along once every few generations. Marina showed that she thinks she is an ordinary person though took a risk to speak up. Because of speaking up, Marina ends up in the notorious Evin Prison and her life changes from there. She has a life sentence, but she occasionally feels that death is the best way out of her troubling life. Ali, one of the prison guards who beat her, begins to come into her life more and more, and we see that the tensions between the relationship of a captor and captive become clear and kind of... interesting. The people who Marina talks about are characters, in reality, as this is a novel, but we have to keep in mind that this story is as real as ever. It's a beautiful story that moved my whole class and I, and a story that told us about someone's life in somewhere across the world. Marina now lives in Canada, half an hour from where I live, and it's amazing to see how successful she has become. She was first successful with having courage to do what she did, but she is now even more courageous to tell her story. I felt such a connection to this book like never before and I seriously am so thankful that I was able to analyze it and pinpoint every literary device Marina uses because why not? She is a writer who easily told her story but left some important messages in between the lines. This is such a lovely story and I wish that Marina would make a film based on her story. She is such an influential woman who mastered the art of writing with this memoir. I never knew much about the Islamic Regime in Iran, and in the midst of learning about this woman's life story, I learned so much about that.
Date published: 2017-04-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from What a story! An excellent addition to any library.
Date published: 2017-04-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing! Inspirational and wonderful story! Great book
Date published: 2017-03-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Story Amazing read about a woman struggle. Very interesting!
Date published: 2017-02-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Inspiring A very gut wrenching yet inspiring story.
Date published: 2017-02-07
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Amazing story Inspired me, specifically has a women!
Date published: 2016-12-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it I loved everything about this book, I couldn't put it down. It was so heart wrenching but I love that everything works out and that she's able to share her story #PlumReview
Date published: 2016-12-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazing I bought this recently because I heard about her story from a friend. Absolutely inspiring and such a thoughtful individual. A must read!!
Date published: 2016-11-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from More than just a good book Marina Nemat’s memoir Prisoner of Tehran is a well-written novel, containing all the proper elements of a good memoir. Fortunately for readers of this book, it turns out to be much more than just a good memoir. It bleeds the horrible past of a young girl trapped in a world of pain and torture. One main reason that Nemat’s novel is such a success is because of the disturbingly personal touch the book has. The book focuses on the time that Marina Nemat spent growing up in the country of Iran and her struggle to survive imprisonment. This book is a peak into the author’s head; it thoroughly describes her thinking process during each life-changing event, which is both intriguing and touching. We discover a lot about the author through these circumstances as does she discover herself. Her courage is an example of what she discovers in the book. Her husband began to explain that this fearlessness was the reason he fell in love with her. He saw her sitting in the prison hallway with the other girls but unlike them she was not crying, she was sitting up straight ready to face her obstacles. This characteristic was not apparent to Nemat until after her time in prison. Whether Marina should endure the hardships ahead or end her life is a reoccurring theme in this memoir. Her situation throughout the book is never certain and Nemat knows that while her fate lies within the government, nothing is guaranteed. The lack of information from the outside world turns her to the only resource of information available, herself. The subject matter of the book is very emotional and you’re often found putting yourself in the position of Nemat and critically thinking about how you would react in her situation due to the heavy life choices she faces. Nemat constantly directs questions towards the reader that helps us develop an attachment to the character. This is a technique that brings her self-inquiry experiences to a new level. The main conflict in the book is if Marina will escape from prison or if it will trap her forever. The conflict in this memoir is one of great complexity. It creates a very tense environment that makes you want to know what happens next. There are many times in the book where we question whether she can survive this or not. A few examples from the book where we were kept on edge is when she is taken to a field where they execute the prisoners or when she has to make a sudden decision on whether she will marry a murder or lead her family to the same fate she suffers. The complications of government control add details to the conflict that make it truly brilliant. Once Marina discovers that the men in charge of the prison now, use to be its prisoners when the former government was in control, Marina is faced with new challenges and doesn’t really know whom she must defeat. In a whole, this book is an empowering story of the struggles of Marina Nemat, developed very well in structure. Her use of self-discovery and inquiry provide the foundation to this memoir but without its gripping conflict, would not have affected me as much as it did.
Date published: 2013-09-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from More than just a good book Marina Nemat’s memoir Prisoner of Tehran is a well-written novel, containing all the proper elements of a good memoir. Fortunately for readers of this book, it turns out to be much more than just a good memoir. It bleeds the horrible past of a young girl trapped in a world of pain and torture. One main reason that Nemat’s novel is such a success is because of the disturbingly personal touch the book has. The book focuses on the time that Marina Nemat spent growing up in the country of Iran and her struggle to survive imprisonment. This book is a peak into the author’s head; it thoroughly describes her thinking process during each life-changing event, which is both intriguing and touching. We discover a lot about the author through these circumstances as does she discover herself. Her courage is an example of what she discovers in the book. Her husband began to explain that this fearlessness was the reason he fell in love with her. He saw her sitting in the prison hallway with the other girls but unlike them she was not crying, she was sitting up straight ready to face her obstacles. This characteristic was not apparent to Nemat until after her time in prison. Whether Marina should endure the hardships ahead or end her life is a reoccurring theme in this memoir. Her situation throughout the book is never certain and Nemat knows that while her fate lies within the government, nothing is guaranteed. The lack of information from the outside world turns her to the only resource of information available, herself. The subject matter of the book is very emotional and you’re often found putting yourself in the position of Nemat and critically thinking about how you would react in her situation due to the heavy life choices she faces. Nemat constantly directs questions towards the reader that helps us develop an attachment to the character. This is a technique that brings her self-inquiry experiences to a new level. The main conflict in the book is if Marina will escape from prison or if it will trap her forever. The conflict in this memoir is one of great complexity. It creates a very tense environment that makes you want to know what happens next. There are many times in the book where we question whether she can survive this or not. A few examples from the book where we were kept on edge is when she is taken to a field where they execute the prisoners or when she has to make a sudden decision on whether she will marry a murder or lead her family to the same fate she suffers. The complications of government control add details to the conflict that make it truly brilliant. Once Marina discovers that the men in charge of the prison now, use to be its prisoners when the former government was in control, Marina is faced with new challenges and doesn’t really know whom she must defeat. In a whole, this book is an empowering story of the struggles of Marina Nemat, developed very well in structure. Her use of self-discovery and inquiry provide the foundation to this memoir but without its gripping conflict, would not have affected me as much as it did.
Date published: 2013-09-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A look at history I read this book for a book club meeting I plan to attend. I had heard, a long time ago, that reading biographies is a good way to learn about history. Just to clarify that statement, I beleive they should be biographies about people that had a part in history. I don't normally read biographies about actors or athletes. I like to read biographies about people who made history or were a part of it. That is why I liked this book. It is a real person. She lived through an expereince that I would wish on no one. It was part of history that we had not heard that too much of. There were few people who could. The authour had two purposes in this novel. One is tell her story. We all have a story to tell. Some people have a better strory to tell, some can tell a story better. This author can do both. This is a story that needs to be told and we have a storyteller that can tell a story. So many people who try to tell their story, can't tell it properly. It is such a boon to the reader when both are achieved. The other purpose is that the author had to tell this story. I don't know why talking about our bad experiences makes us feel better. The author needed to tell us her story for her own piece of mind. And for the hundreds of women that could not. The story had what I expected, torture and executions. There were a few twists that I did not expect. But there had to be for the author to survive a prison for political prisoners in Iran after the revolution. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in history, especially 20th century. I liked the book.
Date published: 2013-08-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A True Eye Opener! I found this book to be well written. I also found it to be heartbreaking and at many different points throughout the book, found myself hugging the book as if I were hugging Marina. I had to fight back the tears to be able to read any further. My heart goes out to you and your loved ones also to the people in Evin . I congratulate you on your courage to move on with life as difficult as it has been. God saved you so you could tell your story and be able to have some happiness come you way.
Date published: 2013-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent read I read this book when it first came out a few years back and instantly loved it. I read it within a couple of hours- that's how drawn I was to it. Would definitely recommend.
Date published: 2012-12-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A story of hope and forgiveness Nemat's memoirs is a great and easy read. The most fascinating aspect was author's great devotion to portrait true sides of each character and go beyond the limits of black and white side in judging her opponents. She doesn't tell her story with hatred but a heart filled with forgiveness and healing! Despite of the brutal tortures and pressures, she has made peace with her self and moved on with a great hope for the future.
Date published: 2012-05-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A True Hero This is one of the most riveting memoirs i have ever read. Marina Nemat doesn't just simply describe the terror of undergoing torture and imprisonment; she tells the story of her life and every heartbreak and tragedy that went with it. a story of amazing strength and perseverence. I've read reviews that call Nemat a "liar" or "traitor", and it disgusts me to read those things. I don't understand how anyone can doubt that this woman is a hero.
Date published: 2011-08-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful I loved this book very much. An incredible insight to a journey none of us would want to make...a wonderful read
Date published: 2011-08-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Prisoner of Tehran A book I could not put down. Marina has seen more in her life than most of us would ever see. Very well written, moving, sad a happy ending to a gruesome life she lived. My heart goes out to you Marina and glad that you are in a happier place.
Date published: 2011-07-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Must Read I really enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone wanting to read a good biography.
Date published: 2011-03-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Interesting & Captivating Interesting story from beginning to end. I really wanted to keep reading to find out what would happen to the characters in the book. I loved Marina's strength and optimism. The book was engaging and the development of the story was fantastic.
Date published: 2010-07-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Proof that fact rivals fiction... Proof that fact rivals fiction. This woman's story really puts a face on human rights abuses. The actual writing is just okay and sometimes it can drag, but the story itself is enough to keep you hooked for every page.
Date published: 2010-03-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Difficult but Inspirational Life Story I picked up this book a few times at the store, then put it down again because I thought it would be too heavy and depressing. But, although Nemat's life is difficult and full of hardship, the memoir was interesting to read. Hearing her overcome the difficulties that she did was an inspiration. It seems that Nemat has a "guardian angel" helping her though her trials. I noticed that there is some controversy on the veracity of her accounts on Wikipedia. Based on my quick research, I could not find anything substantial. On CBC's the "The Hour" blog, her detractors said that they could prove that her account was not true, and she dared them to do just that. Then they did not respond. That tells me their claims are false. I guess to a certain extent, I wanted to believe that the story was false since it was so sad. Overall, it is a difficult but inspirational story. It was also fun to imagine that Nemat lives in the GTA now, and reminds me of some of the amazing stories of newcomers to this country.
Date published: 2009-11-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Not to be missed!!! This is one of the most riveting and powerful books I have ever read. I could not put it down. Marina Nemat is an incredibly brave woman, not only for surviving the Iranian revolution and the atrocities she witnessed and endured both in prison and out, but for having the courage to live through it once again by writing this memoir. An extraordinary story not to be missed!
Date published: 2009-10-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from couldn't put it down! I have recently read this book, and quite enjoyed it. Although it had many horrific, disturbing, and unbelievable situations i couldn't stop reading it until it was done. This memoir makes what you believe are just stories, a reality. They make you realize what some people are living with everyday. This eye openning book i found very good, and would recommend it to anybody. The truth in it is enough to give anyone shivers.
Date published: 2009-06-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Not Bad It is kind of hard to rate a book when it comes to someone's memoirs, overall I'd say the book was not bad and pretty sad at times. There is no doubt that Marina had a very tough life practically growing up in a political prison. She seems like a tough woman to have overcome so much.
Date published: 2009-06-03
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A good read Another book from my book group... i enjoyed this book. Some parts were a little unbelievable... the latter part of the book was a little stale...but overall a good read.
Date published: 2009-05-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good A very good memoir of the horrific times a young lady went through. However, Mayada is a better memoir of a similar subject (Iraq).
Date published: 2008-08-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Couldn't put it down This book was disturbing at times, but still I couldn't put it down. The hardships that Marina had to go through were so tough and especially when you consider her young and tender age. She showed such a strength that I just couldn't imagine. I would highly recommend this book.
Date published: 2008-07-23