Privacy in the Age of Shakespeare by Ronald HuebertPrivacy in the Age of Shakespeare by Ronald Huebert

Privacy in the Age of Shakespeare

byRonald Huebert

Hardcover | March 24, 2016

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For at least a generation, scholars have asserted that privacy barely existed in the early modern era. The divide between the public and private was vague, they say, and the concept, if it was acknowledged, was rarely valued. In Privacy in the Age of Shakespeare, Ronald Huebert challenges these assumptions by marshalling evidence that it was in Shakespeare's time that the idea of privacy went from a marginal notion to a desirable quality.

The era of transition begins with More's Utopia (1516), in which privacy is forbidden. It ends with Milton's Paradise Lost (1667), in which privacy is a good to be celebrated. In between come Shakespeare's plays, paintings by Titian and Vermeer, devotional manuals, autobiographical journals, and the poetry of George Herbert and Robert Herrick, all of which Huebert carefully analyses in order to illuminate the dynamic and emergent nature of early modern privacy.

Ronald Huebert is a professor in the Department of English at Dalhousie University and Carnegie Professor at the University of King's College.
Privacy in the Age of Shakespeare
Privacy in the Age of Shakespeare

by Ronald Huebert

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Title:Privacy in the Age of ShakespeareFormat:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:March 24, 2016Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1442647914

ISBN - 13:9781442647916

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Table of Contents

Preface

Bibliographical Note

Introduction Privacy: The Early Social History of a Word

Chapter 1. Invasions of Privacy in Shakespeare

Chapter 2. Private Devotions

Chapter 3. Voyeurism

Chapter 4. The Commonplace Book and the Private Self

Chapter 5. Privacy and Gender

Chapter 6. Privacy in Paradise

Chapter 7. Privacy and Dissidence

Chapter 8. 'A Fine and Private Place': Andrew Marvell

Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

For at least a generation, scholars have asserted that privacy barely existed in the early modern era. The divide between the public and private was vague, they say, and the concept, if it was acknowledged, was rarely valued. In Privacy in the Age of Shakespeare, Ronald Huebert challenges these assumptions by marshalling evidence that it was in Shakespeare's time that the idea of privacy went from a marginal notion to a desirable quality.The era of transition begins with More's Utopia (1516), in which privacy is forbidden. It ends with Milton's Paradise Lost (1667), in which privacy is a good to be celebrated. In between come Shakespeare's plays, paintings by Titian and Vermeer, devotional manuals, autobiographical journals, and the poetry of George Herbert and Robert Herrick, all of which Huebert carefully analyses in order to illuminate the dynamic and emergent nature of early modern privacy."Privacy in the Age of Shakespeare is a fine and nuanced account of where and how the line between public and private was drawn in the early modern era." - Andrew Wallace, Department of English, Carleton University