Privacy, Intimacy, and Isolation

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byJulie Inness

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Privacy is a puzzling concept. From the backyard to the bedroom, everyday life gives rise to an abundance of privacy claims. In the legal sphere, privacy is invoked with respect to issues including abortion, marriage, and sexuality. Yet privacy is surrounded by a mire of theoretical debate. Certain philosophers argue that privacy is neither conceptually nor morally distinct from other interests, while numerous legal scholars point to the apparently disparate interests involved in constitutional and tort privacy law. By arguing that intimacy is the core of privacy, including privacylaw, Inness undermines privacy skepticism, providing a strong theoretical foundation for many of our everyday and legal privacy claims, including the controversial constitutional right to privacy.

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From Our Editors

Julie C. Inness suggests that intimacy is the core of privacy, including privacy appeals in tort and constitutional law.

From the Publisher

Privacy is a puzzling concept. From the backyard to the bedroom, everyday life gives rise to an abundance of privacy claims. In the legal sphere, privacy is invoked with respect to issues including abortion, marriage, and sexuality. Yet privacy is surrounded by a mire of theoretical debate. Certain philosophers argue that privacy is...

From the Jacket

Julie C. Inness suggests that intimacy is the core of privacy, including privacy appeals in tort and constitutional law.

Julie Inness is at Mount Holyoke College.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:176 pages, 8.19 × 5.43 × 0.51 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195104609

ISBN - 13:9780195104608

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From Our Editors

Julie C. Inness suggests that intimacy is the core of privacy, including privacy appeals in tort and constitutional law.

Editorial Reviews

"An impressive book. One of its greatest qualities is the extreme clarity with which all of the issues are canvassed, enabling the author to tackle a wide subject in a relatively small book. This work will be of great value to lawyers and philosophers alike."--Mind