Privatization: A Theoretical Treatment by Dieter Bos

Privatization: A Theoretical Treatment

byDieter Bos

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

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The trend towards privatization has been particularly strong in the 1980s and 1990s. In the UK, some of the most important public utilities such as telecommunications, gas, and electricity have been privatized. Following unification, Germany is having to privatize an entire economy. This book examines the form of privatization, a topic which has not previously been subjected to rigorous economic analysis, and provides a comprehensive and thorough survey of arguments both for and against it. Both positive and welfare-economic approaches to deal with the complex problems of thetransition from public to private ownership are discussed. The author also examines the central issues of privatization such as why efficiency increases can be expected as a result of privatization, whether full privatization coupled with subsequent regulation is better than partial privatizationwith the government regulating from within the firm. He also looks at the role of trade unions in the privatization process.

About The Author

Dieter Bos is a Professor of Economics at University of Bonn.

Details & Specs

Title:Privatization: A Theoretical TreatmentFormat:HardcoverDimensions:328 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.91 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198283695

ISBN - 13:9780198283690

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`this book provides the reader with a rigorous framework for analysing issues such as the sources of inefficiency in the publicly owned firm, the effect of alternative forms of regulation on efficiency, and the role of trade unions in the privatization process, and more. The book treats thosecomplex subjects thoroughly'Journal of Comparative Economics