Processing the Facial Image: Proceedings of a Royal Society Discussion Meeting held on 9 and 10…

Hardcover | July 1, 1994

EditorV. Bruce, A. Cowey, A. W. Ellis

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Human faces present complex visual patterns that mediate a rich variety of social activity including the recognition of individuals, the perception of emotion, and lipreading. In recent years considerable progress has been made in understanding how these complex images are interpreted by thebrain, and in the development of computer systems for the processing, transmission, and graphical display of faces. This volume provides state-of-the-art reviews of the processes involved in perceiving and recognizing faces, with perspectives from neurophysiology, neuropsychology, cognitivepsychology, and developmental psychology. It also includes contributions from engineering and computer science. The authors are internationally recognized experts drawn from these various disciplines, and they review their own recent contributions to the field. Much of the current impetus andexcitement comes from the remarkable degree of communication and collaboration, often spanning traditional disciplinary boundaries, that characterizes this field of research which is well illustrated by the chapters assembled in this volume.

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From Our Editors

The papers that make up this volume are focused on the theme of Processing the facial image. The authors include engineers, computer scientists, neurophysiologists and psychologists of various persuasions, including developmental, social, cognitive and neuropsychologists. Each contributor was asked to present a state-of-the-art review ...

From the Publisher

Human faces present complex visual patterns that mediate a rich variety of social activity including the recognition of individuals, the perception of emotion, and lipreading. In recent years considerable progress has been made in understanding how these complex images are interpreted by thebrain, and in the development of computer sys...

V. Bruce is at University of Nottingham. A. Cowey is at Oxford University.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:138 pages, 11.61 × 8.27 × 0.55 inPublished:July 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198522614

ISBN - 13:9780198522614

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From Our Editors

The papers that make up this volume are focused on the theme of Processing the facial image. The authors include engineers, computer scientists, neurophysiologists and psychologists of various persuasions, including developmental, social, cognitive and neuropsychologists. Each contributor was asked to present a state-of-the-art review of an aspect of facial image processing, particularly emphasizing their own recent contributions. Much of the current impetus and excitement in the field comes from the fact that these scientists are not working in ignorance of, and isolation from, each other; rather there are abundant signs of interaction and intercommunication.

Editorial Reviews

`this book gives a good overview of a number of important research topics in this field. The chapters are well written and discuss most of the relevant studies, which make this a useful reference book ... this book stands as a very succinct (and in the main very approachable) survey of thestate of the art in research on the processing of facial images.'Edward H.F. de Haan, Utrecht University, British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 86, 1995