The People of New France

Paperback | November 1, 1997

byAllan Greer

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This book surveys the social history of New France. For more than a century, until the British conquest of 1759-60, France held sway over a major portion of the North American continent. In this vast territory several unique colonial societies emerged, societies which in many respects mirrored ancien regime France, but which also incorporated a major Aboriginal component.

Whereas earlier works in this field presented pre-conquest Canada as completely white and Catholic, The People of New France looks closely at other members of society as well: black slaves, English captives and Christian Iroquois of the mission villages near Montreal. The artisans and soldiers, the merchants, nobles, and priests who congregated in the towns of Montreal and Quebec are the subject of one chapter. Another chapter examines the special situation of French regime women under a legal system that recognized wives as equal owners of all family property. The author extends his analysis to French settlements around the Great Lakes and down the Mississippi Valley, and to Acadia and Ile Royale.

Greer's book, addressed to undergraduate students and general readers, provides a deeper understanding of how people lived their lives in these vanished Old-Regime societies.

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From Our Editors

Until the British conquered New France in the 18th century, France ruled the political and social lives of the area's inhabitants. The People of New France examines this unique society that incorporated the aboriginal population into a transplanted version of France. This text looks at all of New France's population, including the litt...

From the Publisher

This book surveys the social history of New France. For more than a century, until the British conquest of 1759-60, France held sway over a major portion of the North American continent. In this vast territory several unique colonial societies emerged, societies which in many respects mirrored ancien regime France, but which also inc...

Allan Greer is a Professor in the Department of History at McGill University.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:130 pages, 8.51 × 5.53 × 0.4 inPublished:November 1, 1997Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0802078168

ISBN - 13:9780802078162

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very inclusive and well written Greer writes eloquently and describes the lifestyle of people in New France as well as discusses the basics of the history of the colony. He makes sure to mention as much as he can about all the groups who lived there, and makes mention of outside colonies such as Acadia as well. Although some of the groups mentioned are not described in much detail, some more so in a passing comment, the book is overall very well written and a very good source of information on New France.  
Date published: 2014-01-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Good collection of essays was informative enough to provide me with a perspective related to my research.
Date published: 2014-01-06

Extra Content

From Our Editors

Until the British conquered New France in the 18th century, France ruled the political and social lives of the area's inhabitants. The People of New France examines this unique society that incorporated the aboriginal population into a transplanted version of France. This text looks at all of New France's population, including the little-examined black slave and Christian Iroquois communities, women who were equal owners of family property and the burgeoning centres of Montreal and Quebec. This text provides illuminating reading for students of Canadian history.