The New Public Health: Discourses, Knowledges, Strategies by Alan PetersenThe New Public Health: Discourses, Knowledges, Strategies by Alan Petersen

The New Public Health: Discourses, Knowledges, Strategies

byAlan Petersen, Deborah Lupton

Paperback | February 10, 1997

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Achieving good health is one of the major concerns of contemporary societies. Everyone is now called upon to play their part in creating a "healthier" and "more ecologically sustainable" environment through attention to lifestyle and involvement in collective efforts to manage risk. These strategies are the mainstay of the so-called "new public health." Alan Petersen and Deborah Lupton focus critically on the new public health, assessing its implications for the concepts of self, embodiment, and citizenship. They argue that the new public health is used as a source of moral regulation and for distinguishing between self and the other. They also explore the implications of the modernist belief in the power of science and the ability of experts to solve problems through the rational administrative means that underpin the strategies and rhetoric of the new public health. Providing a new viewpoint to a highly debated issue, The New Public Health will stimulate discussion for those interested in the fields of public health and health promotion, social policy, sociology of health, and nursing.
Title:The New Public Health: Discourses, Knowledges, StrategiesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.52 inPublished:February 10, 1997Publisher:Sage Publications

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:076195404X

ISBN - 13:9780761954040

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Table of Contents

Introduction The New Public Health A New Morality? Epidemiology Governing by Numbers The `Healthy' Citizen Risk Discourse and `the Environment' The `Healthy' City The Duty to Participate Conclusion