A Respectable Ditch: A History of the Trent Severn Waterway, 1833-1920 by James T. AngusA Respectable Ditch: A History of the Trent Severn Waterway, 1833-1920 by James T. Angus

A Respectable Ditch: A History of the Trent Severn Waterway, 1833-1920

byJames T. Angus

Paperback | October 23, 1998

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Canada's leaders were key participants. Governor-generals, from Sir Guy Carleton, who ordered the first survey, to Lord Syndenham, who cancelled construction in 1841, were intimately involved in the project. For nearly a century every prime minister, from Francis Hincks, who tried to sell the decaying locks and dams, through John A. Macdonald, who revived the scheme, to Robert Borden, who finally completed it, was caught up in this most persistent public project. But the most important participants were countless little-known Canadians who, for one reason or another, promoted the scheme and doggedly pushed it to a conclusion. This is their story.
James T. Angus is professor emeritus of education, Lakehead University."
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Title:A Respectable Ditch: A History of the Trent Severn Waterway, 1833-1920Format:PaperbackDimensions:472 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:October 23, 1998Publisher:McGill-Queen's University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0773518215

ISBN - 13:9780773518216

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Reviews

From Our Editors

The Trent-Severn Waterway took almost 90 years to build, cost more than $24 million and contains some remarkable engineering feats – as well as a few unbelievable mistakes. The passage of the fist boat through the waterway in July 1920 marked the realization of a dream older than Canada itself. James T. Angus documents the history of this mammoth construction project, and shows how the perspectives, selfish interests and national dreams of 19th-century politicians led to the construction of a canal the country could ill-afford.

Editorial Reviews

"In some respects the history of the Trent-Severn Waterway resembles the history of Canada. One parallels the other. The same political and economic tensions that have constantly beset the country can be identified in the canal's story ... Consequently, this is not a story about transportation or engineering. It is about politics -- the politics of dreamers." James T. Angus, from the introduction to A Respectable Ditch