Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada: The Petworth Project, 1832-1837 by Wendy CameronAssisting Emigration to Upper Canada: The Petworth Project, 1832-1837 by Wendy Cameron

Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada: The Petworth Project, 1832-1837

byWendy Cameron, Mary McDougall Maude

Hardcover | August 30, 2000

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Using a rich collection of contemporary sources, this study focuses on one group of English immigrants sent to Upper Canada from Sussex and other southern counties with the aid of parishes and landlords. In Part One, Wendy Cameron follows the work of the Petworth Emigration Committee over six years and trace how the immigrants were received in each of these years. In Part Two, Mary McDougall Maude presents a complete list of emigrants on Petworth ships from 1832 to 1837, including details of their background, family reconstructions, and additional information drawn from Canadian sources. Paternalism strong enough to slow the wheels of change is embodied here in Thomas Sockett, the organizer of the Petworth emigrations, and his patron, the Earl of Egremont, and in Lieutenant Governor Sir John Colborne in Upper Canada. The friction created as these men sought to sustain older values in the relationship between rich and poor highlights the shift in British emigration policy. In these years of transition immigrants sent by the Petworth Emigration Committee could accept assistance and the government direction that went with it, or they could rely on their own resources and find work for themselves. Once the transition was complete, the market-driven model took over and immigrants had to make their own best bargain for their labour.

About The Author

Wendy Cameron is a partner in Wordforce and a visiting scholar at the Northrop Frye Centre, Victoria University at the University of Toronto. Mary McDougall Maude is a partner in Wordforce and Shipton, McDougall Maude Associates, a coordinator of the Publishing Program at Ryerson Polytechnic University, and a visiting scholar at the No...
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Details & Specs

Title:Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada: The Petworth Project, 1832-1837Format:HardcoverDimensions:568 pages, 9.96 × 7.18 × 1.27 inPublished:August 30, 2000Publisher:McGill-Queen's University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0773520341

ISBN - 13:9780773520349

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Impelled to action by rural unrest in 1830, English politicians and landlords re-evaluated their responsibility to combat poverty. Wendy Cameron and Mary McDougall Maude study the influence new attitudes toward the poor had on the government’s approach to emigration and new immigrants in the British colonies. Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada concentrates on one group of immigrants who, through the help of parishes and landlords, transferred from Sussex to Upper Canada and other southern counties, illustrating how the new rules for poverty relief resulted in the acceptance of immigrants into Upper Canada.

Editorial Reviews

"Assisting Emigration to Upper Canada is a very impressively researched [book] ... It contributes to the growing interest in English immigration to Canada, especially in its detailed description of ordinary immigrants ... It also is one of a very few case studies of assisted emigration and has the potential to compliment the large body of literature that exists on unassisted emigration." Catharine Wilson, Department of History, University of Guelph