Edmonton In Our Own Words by Linda GoyetteEdmonton In Our Own Words by Linda Goyette

Edmonton In Our Own Words

byLinda Goyette, Carolina Jakeway RoemmichForeword byKeith Turnbull

Paperback | April 18, 2005

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Imagine a conversation between Edmonton's past inhabitants and its living citizens. What would we tell the rest of the world about our place on the map? What stories would we tell with tears in our eyes, or laughter, or pride? Linda Goyette and Carolina Roemmich have tapped Edmonton's collective memoir, through the written record, the spoken stories and the vast silences. All of the people who ever lived at this bend in the North Saskatchewan took part in creating the city we know as Edmonton. They have plenty to tell us. Through traditional aboriginal stories about the earliest travellers along the bend in the river; oral history, diaries, archival records and letters of 19th century inhabitants; and the recollections of living residents, Edmonton's history comes to life in the words of the people who have called this city home. Citizens with diverse viewpoints speak for themselves, describing important events in Edmonton's social, political, and economic development. The official publication of the City of Edmonton's Centennial, Edmonton In Our Own Words includes many unfamiliar photographs from private collections, historic maps and a timeline of Edmonton's history. As the city celebrates its past and future, readers will enjoy the personal stories of eyewitnesses and descendants explaining, arguing, crying, scolding, laughing and interrupting one another in a city's evolving conversation with itself. ORIGINAL COPY Linda Goyette and Carolina Roemmich have tapped Edmonton's collective memoir through the written record, the spoken stories, and the vast silences. All of the people who ever lived at this bend in the North Saskatchewan took part in creating the city we know as Edmonton. They have plenty to tell us. Through traditional aboriginal stories about the earliest travellers along the bend in the river, diaries, archival records and letters of 19th century inhabitants of the "meeting place" and the recollections of living residents who talk about the emerging city, Edmonton's history is told using the words and stories of the people who have called this city home. The official publication of the City of Edmonton's Centennial, Edmonton In Our Own Words includes many never seen before photographs from private collections, historic maps and a timeline of Edmonton's history. Readers will enjoy the personal stories of eyewitnesses and descendants explaining, arguing, crying, scolding, laughing and interrupting one another in a city's evolving conversation with itself as Edmonton celebrates its past and future. Edmonton's history is brought to life by talking with both familiar and unknown Edmontonians. Citizens with diverse viewpoints speak for themselves, describing important events in Edmonton's social, political, and economic development. "I like to walk along the river and talk to Samuel, Ellen and Laura. Samuel is a coal miner. Ellen plants a garden every spring. Their daughter Laura is a young nurse at the University of Alberta Hospital. I ask them questions about their lives in Edmonton..They don't answer-they died long ago-so I have to imagine their replies." "We arrived in Strathcona-that's how southern Edmonton was called then-on April 14, 1900, on the eve of Thomas' Sunday, happy at last to have reached the end the railway and our destination. We went to the Immigration Hall.... Michael Gowda undertook to look after me. On his recommendation we found a large building which we could have for five dollars a week; the building was a skating rink and provided accommodation for ten families." Peter Svarich's story "Tomorrow they will enter the neighbourhood hall as strangers, and Bill will emerge as the newly acclaimed president of the King Edward Park Community League. It is November 12, 1945. Edmonton has 111,745 residents, plus three. The Hawrelaks are home."
Linda Goyette is a writer, editor, and award-winning journalist. After working for Canadian daily newspapers for twenty years, she published seven books on oral history, contemporary storytelling, and human rights. She divides her time between Alberta and Ontario.Carolina Jakeway Roemmich is a researcher based in Edmonton. She is a gra...
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Title:Edmonton In Our Own WordsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:504 pages, 10 × 7 × 1.25 inPublished:April 18, 2005Publisher:The university of Alberta PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0888644493

ISBN - 13:9780888644497

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Reviews

Editorial Reviews

"Linda Goyette's writing has always suggested that for those of us living in this geography called Canada, it is crucial to make ourselves visible to each other. Goyette has been busy collecting stories from a wide variety of people in Edmonton and every small corner of Alberta. They have come together in three narrative histories that give the stage to voices often excluded from our collective sense of identity, [including] Edmonton In Our Own Words." Thea Bowering, SEE Magazine, October 13-19, 2005