Killer Weed: Marijuana Grow Ops, Media, and Justice by Susan C. BoydKiller Weed: Marijuana Grow Ops, Media, and Justice by Susan C. Boyd

Killer Weed: Marijuana Grow Ops, Media, and Justice

bySusan C. Boyd, Connie Carter

Paperback | January 17, 2014

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Since the late 1990s, marijuana grow operations have been identified by media and others as a new and dangerous criminal activity of "epidemic" proportions. With Killer Weed, Susan C. Boyd and Connie Carter use their analysis of fifteen years of newspaper coverage to show how consensus about the dangerous people and practices associated with marijuana cultivation was created and disseminated by numerous spokespeople including police, RCMP, and the media in Canada. The authors focus on the context of media reports in Canada to show how claims about marijuana cultivation have intensified the perception that this activity poses "significant" dangers to public safety and thus is an appropriate target for Canada's war on drugs.

Boyd and Carter carefully show how the media draw on the same spokespeople to tell the same story again and again, and how a limited number of messages has led to an expanding anti-drug campaign that uses not only police, but BC Hydro and local municipalities to crack down on drug production. Going beyond the newspapers, Killer Weed examines how legal, political, and civil initiatives that have emerged from the media narrative have troubling consequences for a shrinking Canadian civil society.

Susan C. Boyd is a professor in the Faculty of Human and Social Development at the University of Victoria. Connie Carter is a senior policy analyst for the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition.
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Title:Killer Weed: Marijuana Grow Ops, Media, and JusticeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 8.97 × 6.01 × 0.76 inPublished:January 17, 2014Publisher:University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing DivisionLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1442612142

ISBN - 13:9781442612143

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Reviews

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Marijuana Grow Ops: Setting the Scene

Chapter One: A Brief Socio-History of Drug Scares, Racialization, Nation Building, and Policy

Chapter Two: Problematizing Marijuana Grow Ops: Mayerthorpe and Beyond

Chapter Three: Marijuana Grow Ops and Organized Crime

Chapter Four: Racialization of Marijuana Grow Ops

Chapter Five: Civil Responses to Marijuana Grow Ops

Chapter Six: Using Children to Promote Increased Regulation: The Representation and Regulation of Children and Parents Found at Grow Ops

Chapter Seven: Alternative Perspectives

Appendix

Newspaper References

References

Notes

Editorial Reviews

Since the late 1990s, marijuana grow operations have been identified by media and others as a new and dangerous criminal activity of "epidemic" proportions. With Killer Weed, Susan C. Boyd and Connie Carter use their analysis of fifteen years of newspaper coverage to show how consensus about the dangerous people and practices associated with marijuana cultivation was created and disseminated by numerous spokespeople including police, RCMP, and the media in Canada. The authors focus on the context of media reports in Canada to show how claims about marijuana cultivation have intensified the perception that this activity poses "significant" dangers to public safety and thus is an appropriate target for Canada's war on drugs.Boyd and Carter carefully show how the media draw on the same spokespeople to tell the same story again and again, and how a limited number of messages has led to an expanding anti-drug campaign that uses not only police, but BC Hydro and local municipalities to crack down on drug production. Going beyond the newspapers, Killer Weed examines how legal, political, and civil initiatives that have emerged from the media narrative have troubling consequences for a shrinking Canadian civil society."Killer Weed is an interesting and solid work of critical scholarship that is bound to go up the noses of politicians, legislators and policy-makers. The book is based on a large fifteen year sample of newspaper articles about marijuana grow ops and their perceived connections to the worlds of law, politics, crime, and justice. It is a project that blends social construction theory, feminist theory, and cultural criminology to examine media representations of marijuana cultivation and to explain their social significance in relation to race, class, age, and family. The interpretation of the data is intelligent, comprehensive, and convincing, and the book makes a major contribution to drug studies, media studies, criminal justice politics, and critical social policy." - John McMullan, Professor of Sociology and Criminology, Saint Mary’s University