Progress for Food or Food for Progress?: The Political Economy of Agricultural Growth and Development by Folke Dovring

Progress for Food or Food for Progress?: The Political Economy of Agricultural Growth and…

byFolke Dovring

Hardcover | May 1, 1988

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"Development is necessary in all countries, not only the so called underdeveloped' or developed' countries." So begins this comparative analysis of agricultural growth and development around the world, not just in developing countries. Unique to this volume is its comprehensive coverage of numerous countries around the world and its in-depth comparison of economic change in relation to historical and geographic diversity. These features, along with ground-breaking conclusions put forth by the author, will interest not only economists, economic journalists, politicians, and business leaders seeking to understand the workings of the international community, but also scholars and students of development, agricultural economic, and comparative economics.

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Title:Progress for Food or Food for Progress?: The Political Economy of Agricultural Growth and…Format:HardcoverDimensions:330 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:May 1, 1988Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275929043

ISBN - 13:9780275929046

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?In this book, Dovring's thought ranges broadly over agricultural history and institutions, and a worldwide variety of agricultural policies. The book is organized by agricultural development topics in the first part, e.g., food demand, population growth, productivity in agriculture, national agricultural policies, and international aid. This is followed by an analysis of agricultural growth and development throughout the world, which is presented in seven regional surveys: Tropical Africa; North Africa and the Middle East; Monsoon Asia; Latin America; USSR and Eastern Europe; Western and Southern Europe; and North America and Oceania. Each of the 23 chapters contains a long and somewhat idiosyncratic bibliography that is of interest in itself. His book is both a textbook for undergraduates on world agriculture and an overview for the interested nonspecialist. A good survey volume for academic and public library collections.?-Choice