Project Mulberry by Linda Sue Park

Project Mulberry

byLinda Sue Park

Kobo ebook | April 18, 2005

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Julia Song and her friend Patrick would love to win a blue ribbon, maybe even two, at the state fair. They’ve always done projects together, and they work well as a team. This time, though, they’re having trouble coming up with just the right project. Then Julia’s mother offers a suggestion: They can raise silkworms, as she did when she was a girl in Korea.

Patrick thinks it’s a great idea. Of course there are obstacles—for example, where will they get mulberry leaves, the only thing silkworms eat?—but nothing they can’t handle.

Julia isn’t so sure. The club where kids do their projects is all about traditional American stuff, and raising silkworms just doesn’t fit in. Moreover, the author, Ms. Park, seems determined to make Julia’s life as complicated as possible, no matter how hard Julia tries to talk her out of it.

In this contemporary novel, Linda Sue Park delivers a funny, lively story that illuminates both the process of writing a novel and the meaning of growing up American.

Title:Project MulberryFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:April 18, 2005Publisher:Houghton Mifflin HarcourtLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0547350120

ISBN - 13:9780547350127

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Project Mulberry by Linda Sue Park Project Mulberry is a book about a friendship between a white boy, Patrick, and Korean-American, Julia, who decide to do a science project together for the state fair. The project is essentially Animal Husbandry of silkworms. Over the course of the story there is a lot of science and environmentalism worked in along with race relations to boot. The kids deal with whole, half and non-truths. Also there are nice snippets of dialogue between chapters where the author talks to her self-object, Julia, and works out for the reader some of the process for writing the story. So the reader gets a behind the scenes type look at the writing process. I would teach this book to middle school and up. It would be a great book for a science teacher and language arts teacher to team up on. My thinking is that the science teacher would have students partner up and do an actual project together. Ideally the more mixing and matching or students by sex, race and interests that could be done to immolate the lessons of the book would enhance things. I think this passage is a great example of showing how a seventh grader sees a complicated problem like adult level ignorance and an inability for the adult to deal with that ignorance even when it is glaring them in the face.
Date published: 2017-12-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Project Mulberry by Linda Sue Park Project Mulberry is a book about a friendship between a white boy, Patrick, and Korean-American, Julia, who decide to do a science project together for the state fair. The project is essentially Animal Husbandry of silkworms. Over the course of the story there is a lot of science and environmentalism worked in along with race relations to boot. The kids deal with whole, half and non-truths. Also there are nice snippets of dialogue between chapters where the author talks to her self-object, Julia, and works out for the reader some of the process for writing the story. So the reader gets a behind the scenes type look at the writing process. I would teach this book to middle school and up. It would be a great book for a science teacher and language arts teacher to team up on. My thinking is that the science teacher would have students partner up and do an actual project together. Ideally the more mixing and matching or students by sex, race and interests that could be done to immolate the lessons of the book would enhance things. I think this passage is a great example of showing how a seventh grader sees a complicated problem like adult level ignorance and an inability for the adult to deal with that ignorance even when it is glaring them in the face.
Date published: 2017-12-13