Proletarian Power: Shanghai In The Cultural Revolution by Elizabeth PerryProletarian Power: Shanghai In The Cultural Revolution by Elizabeth Perry

Proletarian Power: Shanghai In The Cultural Revolution

byElizabeth Perry, Li Xun

Paperback | January 10, 1997

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This pathbreaking book offers the first in-depth study of Chinese labor activism during the momentous upheaval of the Cultural Revolution. The authors explore three distinctive forms of working-class protest: rebellion, conservatism, and economism. Labor, they argue, was working at cross-purposes through these three modes of militancy promoted by different types of leaders with differing agendas and motivations. Drawing upon a wealth of heretofore inaccessible archival sources, the authors probe the divergent political, psychocultural, and socioeconomic strains within the Shanghai labor movement. As they convincingly illustrate, the multiplicity of worker responses to the Cultural Revolution cautions against a one-dimensional portrait of working-class politics in contemporary China.
Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom is associate professor of history at Indiana University. Elizabeth J. Perry is professor of political science at the University of California at Berkeley. Elizabeth J. Perry is Robson Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Berkeley. Li Xun is a visiting researcher in the Institute of Ea...
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Title:Proletarian Power: Shanghai In The Cultural RevolutionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:264 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.6 inPublished:January 10, 1997Publisher:Avalon Publishing

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0813321654

ISBN - 13:9780813321653

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This pathbreaking book offers the first in-depth study of Chinese labor activism during the momentous upheaval of the Cultural Revolution. Arguing that labor was working at cross purposes, the authors explore three distinctive and different forms of working-class protest: rebellion, conservatism, and economism. Drawing upon a wealth of heretofore inaccessible archival sources, the authors probe the divergent political, psychocultural, and socioeconomic strains within the Shanghai labor movement, convincingly illustrating the complexity of working-class politics in contemporary China.