Psychotherapy, American Culture, and Social Policy: Immoral Individualism by E. ThroopPsychotherapy, American Culture, and Social Policy: Immoral Individualism by E. Throop

Psychotherapy, American Culture, and Social Policy: Immoral Individualism

byE. Throop

Hardcover | February 13, 2009

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Psychotherapy, American Culture, and Social Policy provides a lively indictment of psychotherapy and individualism by examining American cultural structures-child-rearing, family life, mental illness, and education. Throop advances a complex argument that American reliance on psychotherapy to explain these structures is a poor justification which neglects those most in need and pain. Both interdisciplinary and solidly anthropological, this study is sure to provoke discussion from both the right and the left and cause serious consideration of Throop’s call for cultural change and just social policies.

Elizabeth A. Throop is Chair of the Department of Anthropology, Sociology, and Social Work and Associate Professor of Anthropology at Eastern Kentucky University. Her research specialties include family life cross-culturally and mental illness across cultures.  She has practiced family therapy in the Chicago area with violent and sexu...
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Title:Psychotherapy, American Culture, and Social Policy: Immoral IndividualismFormat:HardcoverDimensions:200 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0 inPublished:February 13, 2009Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230609457

ISBN - 13:9780230609457

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Table of Contents

American Culture in Cross-Cultural Context * Psychotherapy and Hyperindividualism * Poverty is Just a State Of Mind * The Kids Aren’t All Right * Those Who Can’t Teach * The Sacrifice of Our Children * Still Crazy After All These Years * Color Blind Hearts and Minds

Editorial Reviews

“Throop’s book is a real winner. The book cuts across clinical psychology and cultural studies. It improves greatly on some similar material and attempts to trace individualism in actual policies. Throop knows the literature and has gone about a cultural critique in a sensible way.”-- William Epstein, Professor Emeritus, School of Social Work, University of Nevada, Las Vegas