Public Debt Management

Hardcover | December 15, 1999

byAlessandro Missale

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The choice of currency denomination, indexation, and maturity structure of public debt is an increasingly important aspect of policy in a world of high debts and and financially integrated markets. This book surveys theories and evidence on public debt composition and debt returns with thegoal of emphasizing the main policy issues. The effects of debt management on financial markets, risk-sharing, policy credibility, interest costs, and taxation are evaluated within a unified theoretical framework. The analysis clarifies the trade-off involved in policy decisions and shows how to usetheory and evidence to answer practical policy problems. This book is a valuable reference to researchers and satisfies the increasing demand by policymakers for sound economic principles to guide the choice of debt instruments.

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The choice of currency denomination, indexation, and maturity structure of public debt is an increasingly important aspect of policy in a world of high debts and and financially integrated markets. This book surveys theories and evidence on public debt composition and debt returns with thegoal of emphasizing the main policy issues. Th...

Alessandro Missale is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Political Science, University of Florence. Between 1997 and 1998 he held the Houblon-Norman Fellowship at the Bank of England.
Format:HardcoverPublished:December 15, 1999Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198290853

ISBN - 13:9780198290858

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Table of Contents

Policy IssuesThe Effects of Debt ManagementHow Should the Public Debt be Managed?Debt Composition and Debt Maturity: The EvidenceMinimizing RiskMinimizing CostPolicy ConclusionsAppendix: Data and Data Sources