Public Faces and Private Identities in Seventeenth-Century Holland: Portraiture And The Production Of Community by Ann Jensen AdamsPublic Faces and Private Identities in Seventeenth-Century Holland: Portraiture And The Production Of Community by Ann Jensen Adams

Public Faces and Private Identities in Seventeenth-Century Holland: Portraiture And The Production…

byAnn Jensen Adams

Hardcover | March 30, 2009

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During the seventeenth century, Dutch portraits were actively commissioned by corporate groups and by individuals from a range of economic and social classes. Ann Jensen Adams examines four portrait genres - individuals, the family, history portraits, and civic guards. Adams argues that as individuals became unmoored from traditional sources of identity, such as familial lineage, birthplace, and social class, portraits helped them to find security in a self-aware subjectivity and the new social structures that made possible the 'economic miracle' that has come to be known as the Dutch Golden Age.
Ann Jensen Adams is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A scholar of Dutch painting, she is editor of Rembrandt's Bathsheba Reading David's Letter and has contributed to The Art Bulletin and the Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek. She has received fellowships from The Mrs Giles Whiting Fo...
Title:Public Faces and Private Identities in Seventeenth-Century Holland: Portraiture And The Production…Format:HardcoverDimensions:412 pages, 9.96 × 6.97 × 1.1 inPublished:March 30, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521444551

ISBN - 13:9780521444552

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Table of Contents

1. The cultural power of portraits: the market, interpersonal experience, and subjectivity; 2. Portraits of individuals: Physiognomy, demeanor, and the representation of character; 3. Family portraits: the private arena and the social order; 4. The history portrait: comprehending self through historical narrative; 5. Civic guard portraits: personal friendships and the public sphere; 6. Portraits and the production of identity: transitional objects and potential spaces.

Editorial Reviews

"Her emphasis on multiple social identities that crossed regional, class, and religious boundaries evokes the important social role of the pictures she examines for a culturally diverse society and consequently the centrality of context for understanding how they were viewed."
-CATHERINE LEVESQUE,The College of William and Mary