Public Pantheons in Revolutionary Europe: Comparing Cultures of Remembrance, c. 1790-1840 by E. Bouwers

Public Pantheons in Revolutionary Europe: Comparing Cultures of Remembrance, c. 1790-1840

byE. Bouwers

Hardcover | November 22, 2011

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The story of how the concept of a pantheon, a building honouring great individuals, spread across Revolutionary Europe and interacted with socio-political and cultural changes. Analysing the canon and iconography of each pantheon, Bouwers shows how the commemoration of war and celebration of nationhood gave way to the protection of elite interests.

About The Author

EVELINE G. BOUWERSPostdoctoral Research Fellow at Bielefeld University, Germany. Her current research focuses on the use of violence and iconoclasm in the culture wars of modern Europe. She studied history, art history, and political science in Utrecht, Leuven and Amsterdam and holds a PhD from the European University Institute.

Details & Specs

Title:Public Pantheons in Revolutionary Europe: Comparing Cultures of Remembrance, c. 1790-1840Format:HardcoverDimensions:344 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.04 inPublished:November 22, 2011Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230294715

ISBN - 13:9780230294714

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction: The Journey of the European Pantheonic Imagination
Pantheon: the History of a Concept on the Move
Competition in the Parliamentary Pantheon in London
The Eclipse of Exemplarity: the Imperial Pantheon in Paris
A Papal Pantheon? Canova's 'illustrious Italians' in Rome
'National education' in a Royal Pantheon in Regensburg
Conclusions: Public Pantheons: a European History?
Bibliography
Appendices

Editorial Reviews

'Each case is well documented and skillfully studied. This is particularly profitable for her discussion of the Roman and Bavarian episodes, which are less well-known. The work is especially convincing when describing the specifics of each experience, which all together provide her model of the state monopoly of commemoration.' – Antoine Lilti, Annales