Puerto Rican Jam: Rethinking Colonialism and Nationalism by Frances Negron-MuntanerPuerto Rican Jam: Rethinking Colonialism and Nationalism by Frances Negron-Muntaner

Puerto Rican Jam: Rethinking Colonialism and Nationalism

EditorFrances Negron-Muntaner

Paperback | November 7, 2008

Pricing and Purchase Info

$32.50

Earn 163 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

Ships within 3-5 weeks

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Challenges the framing of Puerto Rican cultural politics as a dichotomy between nationalism and colonialism.

Discussions of Puerto Rican cultural politics usually fall into one of two categories, nationalist or colonialist. Puerto Rican Jam moves beyond this narrow dichotomy, elaborating alternatives to dominant postcolonial theories, and includes essays written from the perspectives of groups that are not usually represented, such as gays and lesbians, youth, blacks, and women. Among the topics discussed are the limitations of nationalism as a transformative and democratizing political discourse, the contradictory impact of American colonialism, language politics, and the 1928 U.S. congressional hearings on women's suffrage in Puerto Rico.

Title:Puerto Rican Jam: Rethinking Colonialism and NationalismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.8 inPublished:November 7, 2008Publisher:University of Minnesota Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0816628491

ISBN - 13:9780816628490

Reviews

From Our Editors

Challenges the framing of Puerto Rican cultural politics as a dichotomy between nationalism and colonialism.Discussions of Puerto Rican cultural politics usually fall into one of two categories, nationalist or colonialist. Puerto Rican Jam moves beyond this narrow dichotomy, elaborating alternatives to dominant postcolonial theories, and includes essays written from the perspectives of groups that are not usually represented, such as gays and lesbians, youth, blacks, and women. Among the topics discussed are the limitations of nationalism as a transformative and democratizing political discourse, the contradictory impact of American colonialism, language politics, and the 1928 U.S. congressional hearings on women's suffrage in Puerto Rico.