Punishment and the Moral Emotions: Essays in Law, Morality, and Religion

Paperback | February 10, 2014

byJeffrie G. Murphy

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This collection of essays presents Jeffrie G. Murphy's most recent ideas on punishment, forgiveness, and the emotions of resentment, shame, guilt, remorse, love, and jealousy. In Murphy's view, conscious rationales of principle - such as crime control or giving others what in justice theydeserve - do not always drive our decisions to punish or condemn others for wrongdoing. Sometimes our decisions are in fact driven by powerful and rather base emotions such as malice, spite, envy, and cruelty. But our decisions to punish or condemn can also be driven by noble emotions. Indeed, if wepunish to express the justified resentment and indignation that decent people feel toward the wronging of a human being, punishment and condemnation can be seen acts of love. Once we realize the vital roles that emotions can play in punishment and other forms of condemnation, we can explore them in a variety of important ways. Jealousy sometimes causes crimes, forgiveness allows us to overcome resentment, and mercy - inspired by compassion - limits the severity ofpunishment. All these emotions may be called "moral emotions" - meaning simply that they are emotions that essentially involve a moral belief. The essays in this collection explore, from philosophical and religious perspectives, a variety of moral emotions and their relationship to punishment and condemnation or to decisions to lessen punishment or condemnation. Those interested in ethics, philosophy of law, and the nature and role of theemotions, will find much of interest in these essays by this highly distinguished scholar.

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This collection of essays presents Jeffrie G. Murphy's most recent ideas on punishment, forgiveness, and the emotions of resentment, shame, guilt, remorse, love, and jealousy. In Murphy's view, conscious rationales of principle - such as crime control or giving others what in justice theydeserve - do not always drive our decisions to p...

Jeffrie G. Murphy is Regents Professor of Philosophy and Law at Arizona State University. He is the author of Getting Even: Forgiveness and Its Limits.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.68 inPublished:February 10, 2014Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199357455

ISBN - 13:9780199357451

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Table of Contents

Sources and AcknowledgmentsIntroduction1. Forgiveness, Reconciliation and Responding to Evil: A Philosophical Overview2. Moral Epistemology, the Retributive Emotions, and the 'Clumsy Moral Philosophy' of Jesus Christ3. Christian Love and Criminal Punishment4. Legal Moralism and Retribution Revisited5. Shame Creeps Through Guilt and Feels Like Retribution6. Repentance, Mercy, and Communicative Punishment7. Remorse, Apology, and Mercy - with new appendix8. The Case of Dostoyevsky's General - Some Ruminations on Forgiving the Unforgivable9. Response to Neu, Zipursky, and Steiker10. Jealousy, Shame, and the Rival11. Moral Reasons and the Limitations of Liberty12. The Elusive Nature of Human DignityIndex

Editorial Reviews

"This welcome new collection of essays displays all the virtues that we have come to expect from Murphy's work: a distinctive voice, a sensitivity to the acute moral problems posed by our practices of punishment, illuminating discussions informed by a lucid philosophical and moral imagination.It makes more widely available Murphy's further thoughts on such central concepts as guilt, remorse, retribution, repentance, forgiveness, mercy and dignity, and should confirm his standing as one of the most interesting contemporary writers on criminal law and its moral foundations." --Antony Duff, University of Stirling