Quo Vadis; A Tale Of The Time Of Nero, Tr. By Dr. S. A. Binion...and S. Malevsky, Illustrated By M…

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byHenryk K. Sienkiewicz

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...that ye may trust me. 1 know where Lygia is. I have come here from before the house of Linus, which is close to this dwelling. Caesar hath given me the right to possess her. I have nearly five hundred slaves in my house. I could surround her abode and carry her off. But I have not done this, and I will not do it." "Then may the blessing of the Lord descend upon thee and purify thy heart," said Peter. "I thank thee. But hearken further. I did not do so, though I live in a torment of longing. Before I came among ye, I would surely have carried her off and held her by force. But your virtue and your creed, though I profess it not, have made some great change in my soul, so that I dare not use force. I myself cannot comprehend it, but so CHAPTER XI. it is. That is why I come to you, for ye stand to Lygia in the place of father and mother, and I say to ye, 'Give me Lygia for my wife, and I swear that not only will I allow her to confess Christ, but I myself will begin to learn His creed.'" He held his head erect. His voice was firm. Nevertheless he was moved. His legs trembled beneath his striped mantle. When he noticed the hush that followed his words, he went on as if anticipating a refusal: "I know the obstacles in the way. But I love her as my own eyes. Though I am not your enemy--neither yours nor Christ's--I wish to meet you truthfully, so that you may trust me. I am staking my whole life on this issue. But I tell you the truth. Some might say, 'Baptize me.' But I say, 'Give me light.' I believe in Christ's resurrection, for truthful witnesses have told me this who saw Him after death. I believe, for I have seen it, that your religion teaches virtue, justice and charity, but not the crimes of which you are suspected. Still, I fail to...

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1897 edition. Excerpt: ...that ye may trust me. 1 know where Lygia is. I have come here from before the house of Linus, which is close to...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:194 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.41 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:021726915X

ISBN - 13:9780217269155

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Customer Reviews of Quo Vadis; A Tale Of The Time Of Nero, Tr. By Dr. S. A. Binion...and S. Malevsky, Illustrated By M. De Lipman

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Majestic Historical Epic An epic story of transforming love in ancient Rome, this is first and foremost an historical novel. But the historicity is awash in Sienkewicz's construction of the human experience of Nero's Rome, with all of its vile decadence and repugnant pagan extravagances which inevitably fail to mask the ugliness of Nero's cruel and murderous regime. I recommend this novel to anyone interested in reading for the sake of enlightenment as well as just being entertained by a good story, for this book is full of interesting historical information surrounding two major events in the first half of the 7th century: the burning of Rome and the rise (and persecution) of Christianity in Rome during this time. Sienkiewicz is meticulous in his understanding and portrayal of historical events and the prevailing mindset of Roman paganism coming to be replaced by that of the Christian. This transformation is symbolically realized in the love story of Vinicius, a young and powerful patrician who is won over by the meek and beautiful Christian princess, Ligia. The author's strength is in his ability to set this love story in such historical detail that it makes the narrative come alive, like a brilliant diamond in a golden setting. In particular, his characterization of the self-absorbed and monstrous Nero is all the more chilling because of its verisimilitude. If Sienkiewicz loses touch anywhere, it may be in his overly sympathetic representation of the Christians in the story who, though flawed, seem almost too magnanimous for such a tremendous study of fictional realism. He also fails to hide (and probably knowingly so) his rather Roman Catholic understanding of St. Peter's involvement in the Christianization of Rome. At almost 600 pages, this novel is not for the faint of heart. But those interested in partaking in a majestic historical epic will find nothing much better than this.
Date published: 2008-08-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Majestic Historical Epic An epic story of transforming love in ancient Rome, this is first and foremost an historical novel. But the historicity is awash in Sienkewicz's construction of the human experience of Nero's Rome, with all of its vile decadence and repugnant pagan extravagances which inevitably fail to mask the ugliness of Nero's cruel and murderous regime. I recommend this novel to anyone interested in reading for the sake of enlightenment as well as just being entertained by a good story, for this book is full of interesting historical information surrounding two major events in the first half of the 7th century: the burning of Rome and the rise (and persecution) of Christianity in Rome during this time. Sienkiewicz is meticulous in his understanding and portrayal of historical events and the prevailing mindset of Roman paganism coming to be replaced by that of the Christian. This transformation is symbolically realized in the love story of Vinicius, a young and powerful patrician who is won over by the meek and beautiful Christian princess, Ligia. The author's strength is in his ability to set this love story in such historical detail that it makes the narrative come alive, like a brilliant diamond in a golden setting. In particular, his characterization of the self-absorbed and monstrous Nero is all the more chilling because of its verisimilitude. If Sienkiewicz loses touch anywhere, it may be in his overly sympathetic representation of the Christians in the story who, though flawed, seem almost too magnanimous for such a tremendous study of fictional realism. He also fails to hide (and probably knowingly so) his rather Roman Catholic understanding of St. Peter's involvement in the Christianization of Rome. At almost 600 pages, this novel is not for the faint of heart. But those interested in partaking in a majestic historical epic will find nothing much better than this.
Date published: 2008-07-30