Race, Media, and the Crisis of Civil Society: From Watts to Rodney King by Ronald N. JacobsRace, Media, and the Crisis of Civil Society: From Watts to Rodney King by Ronald N. Jacobs

Race, Media, and the Crisis of Civil Society: From Watts to Rodney King

byRonald N. Jacobs

Paperback | August 28, 2000

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Since the early nineteenth century, African-Americans have turned to Black newspapers to monitor the mainstream media and to develop alternative interpretations of public events. Ronald Jacobs tells the stories of these newspapers--in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles--for the first time, comparing African-American and "mainstream" media coverage of racial crises such as the Watts riot, the beating of Rodney King, the Los Angeles uprisings and the O. J. Simpson trial. In an engaging yet scholarly style, Jacobs shows us why a strong African-American press is still needed today.
Title:Race, Media, and the Crisis of Civil Society: From Watts to Rodney KingFormat:PaperbackDimensions:204 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.47 inPublished:August 28, 2000Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521625785

ISBN - 13:9780521625784

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 2. Race, media and multiple publics; 3. Historicizing the public sphere(s): New York, Los Angeles, Chicago; 4. The Watts uprisings of 1965; 5. The Rodney King beating; 6. Rodney King 1992; 7. Conclusion; Notes; References; Index.

From Our Editors

African-Americans have trusted black newspapers since the early 19th century to observe the mainstream media and present alternative perspectives on public events. Ronald N. Jacobs chronicles these newspapers’ stories in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. The first book of its kind, intelligent, compelling and thought-provoking, Race, Media and the Crisis of Civil Society compares how African-American and mainstream media cover racial crises such as the Watts riot, Rodney King beating, Los Angeles uprisings and the O.J. Simpson trial. Jacobs illustrates the significance a strong African-American press continues to have today.

Editorial Reviews

"This compact work should appeal to those studying race, conflict, and the role of media in society, particularly the different roles that 'big' and 'small' media may play... The book provides valuable insights into the processes of journalistic and societal framings of racial issues during the latter half of the twentieth century... In total, the book makes a compelling argument for the black press as a unique voice, not a substitute for participation in the mainstream media... Jacob's book brings us face-to-face with questions that will color our view of our multicultural world for years to come." Kimberly A. Neuendorf, Contemporary Sociology