Reading The Eve of St.Agnes: The Multiples of Complex Literary Transaction

Hardcover | August 1, 1999

byJack Stillinger

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Using the 180-year history of Keats'sEve of St. Agnes as a basis for theorizing about the reading process, Stillinger's book explores the nature and whereabouts of "meaning" in complex works. A proponent of authorial intent, Stillinger argues a theoretical compromise between author and reader,applying a theory of interpretive democracy that includes the endlessly multifarious reader's response as well as Keats's guessed-at intent. Stillinger also considers the process of constructing meaning, and posits an answer to why Keats's work is considered canonical, and why it is still being readand admired.

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Using the 180-year history of Keats'sEve of St. Agnes as a basis for theorizing about the reading process, Stillinger's book explores the nature and whereabouts of "meaning" in complex works. A proponent of authorial intent, Stillinger argues a theoretical compromise between author and reader,applying a theory of interpretive democracy...

Jack Stillinger is at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

other books by Jack Stillinger

Multiple Authorship and the Myth of Solitary Genius
Multiple Authorship and the Myth of Solitary Genius

Hardcover|Apr 30 1999

$153.86 online$159.50list price
Format:HardcoverPublished:August 1, 1999Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195130227

ISBN - 13:9780195130225

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"It is a very suggestive book, scholarly yet unfussy and broad-minded; it ranges patiently round the great questions and manages to be progressive and reactionary at once (as its author happily acknowledges on p. ix). It might even set the cat among the pigeons, a prime function ofcriticism."--Modern Philology