Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of Boyhood by William Pollack

Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of Boyhood

byWilliam Pollack, Mary Pipher

Kobo ebook | May 10, 1999

Pricing and Purchase Info

$10.99

Available for download

Not available in stores

about

Based on William Pollack's groundbreaking research at Harvard Medical School over two decades, *Real Boys*explores this generation's "silent crisis": why many boys are sad, lonely, and confused although they may appear tough, cheerful, and confident. Pollack challenges conventional expectations about manhood and masculinity that encourage parents to treat boys as little men, raising them through a toughening process that drives their true emotions underground. Only when we understand what boys are really like, says Pollack, can we help them develop more self-confidence and the emotional savvy they need to deal with issues such as depression, love and sexuality, drugs and alcohol, divorce, and violence.

“Just as Reviving Ophelia opened our eyes to the challenges faced by adolescent girls, Real Boys helps us hear and respond to the needs of growing boys.” —*Judith Jordan, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School*

Featuring a new preface by the author on how parents can make a difference.

Title:Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of BoyhoodFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:May 10, 1999Publisher:Henry Holt and Co.Language:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1429935030

ISBN - 13:9781429935036

Look for similar items by category:

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Real Boys is the Real Thing In this detailed study of the emotional and psychological lives of boys, Pollack talks to parents and teachers of boys (and girls) about the way we have been raising boys, using a 19th century model or code against which boys judge themselves and society regards them - the so-called "Boy Code." Pollack says that boys are shamed into not expressing their feelings, which has led to the myths that boys will be (and should be) boys and that they are toxic - "emotionally unsocialized creatures." Fortunately Pollack has many suggestions for parents and for schools. Pollack also presents a list of symptoms to watch for to determine if a boy is depressed, which should be turned into a checklist and used by all parents of boys and all school personnel. This book is an eye-opener about how we as adults can be doing our young boys much harm. We must not forget what we have learned in the past few decades working with female issues, but we now owe our sons a similar degree of interest. The suggestions in this book should be taken seriously and all parents should think about how they can be applied to their sons' lives. Pollack also present many challenges to schools, and his list of suggestions in chapter 10 should be considered by all school personnel to determine how their school does, or could, measure up.
Date published: 2000-08-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from MUST READ THIS This book is very easy to read and to the point. An Excellent read and a MUST read.. for parents and educators especially. Anyone involved in media should read this too.
Date published: 2000-03-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Real Boys Coming from a family of three girls, with my father dying when I was just 18 I had NO idea nor framework of what it would be like raising a son. This book is a bible to me. Trying to raise a son as a feeling, thinking individual conflicts greatly with society's traditional "Boy Myth", and the balancing act that I am trying to instill in my son makes both him and me nuts, at times. This book helps. In fact, I give a copy to each of my son's teachers as a gift!
Date published: 1999-08-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Real Boys I have a son, but I never had a brother. I didn't understand how fragile a small boy can be - how easily their feelings are hurt and how hard it is to mend the hurt. William Pollack's book helped me realize that I had been raising my son to conform with a stereotype that I don't even value. It's a powerful and well-written book that should become a bookshelf fixture for homes where there are boys.
Date published: 1999-05-17