Realism in Mathematics by Penelope Maddy

Realism in Mathematics

byPenelope Maddy

Paperback | July 1, 1993

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When engaged in mathematics, most people tend to think of themselves as scientists investigating the features of real mathematical things, and the wildly successful application of mathematics in the physical sciences reinforces this picture of mathematics as an objective study. Forphilosophers, however, this realism about mathematics raises serious questions: What are mathematical things? Where are they? How do we know about them? Penelope Maddy delineates and defends a novel version of mathematical realism that answers the traditional questions and refocuses philosophicalattention on the pressing foundational issues of contemporary mathematics.

About The Author

Penelope Maddy is at University of California, Irvine; and currently Chair of the Department of Philosophy.
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Details & Specs

Title:Realism in MathematicsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:216 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.55 inPublished:July 1, 1993Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019824035X

ISBN - 13:9780198240358

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`She sets herself the task of presenting her views in a manner 'accessible to both non-philospohical mathematicians and non-mathematical philosophers [as well as] students and interested amateurs'. This is a worthy aim, and the extent to which she achieves it is admirable. She is particularlyadept at sketching in the background to the philosophical and mathematical problems that arise along the way.'Colin Cheyne, University of Otago, Meta Science, New Series Issue Six 1994