Realistic Philosophy Defended In A Philosophic Series Volume 2;  Historical And Critical by James MccoshRealistic Philosophy Defended In A Philosophic Series Volume 2;  Historical And Critical by James Mccosh

Realistic Philosophy Defended In A Philosophic Series Volume 2; Historical And Critical

byJames Mccosh

Paperback | May 18, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 Excerpt: ...association of ideas; we are accustomed to see cause and effect together, and when we see the one we are constrained, whether we will or not, to think of and expect the other. But this is not the kind of necessity which metaphysicians appeal to. Necessity as a test of truth is a necessity of cognition, belief, or judgment, arising from our viewing the nature of the object, as, for example, when on contemplating two straight lines, we perceive, without any mediate proof, that they cannot inclose a space. Our commentator on Hume has equally misunderstood the nature of this necessity. He speaks of three kinds of necessity. The first is one merely requiring the consistent use of language: "The necessary truth A=A means that the perception which is called A shall always be called A." This throws no light on our convictions. The second, "The necessary truth that'two straight lines cannot inclose a space,' means that we have no memory, and can form no expectation of their so doing." The instance he gives is a good example of an intuitive truth seen at once, and necessarily believed; but it surely implies vastly more than merely that we have no memory, and can form no expectation of the straight lines inclosing a space; it means that we perceive that, from the very nature of things, two such lines cannot inclose a space. He has a third case of necessity, " The denial of the necessary truth that the thought now in my mind exists, involves the denial of consciousness." This is also an example of a self-evident, necessary truth, but it is so because we have an immediate knowledge of ourselves as existing. VI. Hume's doctrine of causation takes a double form; the one objective, the other subjective. These two are intimately connected, and ...
Title:Realistic Philosophy Defended In A Philosophic Series Volume 2; Historical And CriticalFormat:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.2 inPublished:May 18, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217979254

ISBN - 13:9780217979252

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