Reason in the Age of Science

Paperback | September 14, 1983

byHans-georg GadamerTranslated byFrederick G. Lawrence

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The essays in this book deal broadly with the question of what form reasoning about life and society can take in a culture permeated by scientific and technical modes of thought. They attempt to identify certain very basic types of questions that seem to escape scientific resolution and call for, in Gadamer's view, philosophical reflection of a hermeneutic sort.In effect, Gadamer argues for the continued practical relevance of Socratic-Platonic modes of thought in respect to contemporary issues. As part of this argument, he advances his own views on the interplay of science, technology, and social policy.These essays, which are not available in any existing translation or collection of Gadamer's work, are remarkably up-to-date with respect to the present state of his thinking, and they address issues that are particularly critical to social theory and philosophy.Perhaps more than anyone else, Hans-Georg Gadamer, who is Professor Emeritus at the University of Heidelberg and Distinguished Visiting Professor at Boston College, is the doyen of German Philosophy. His previously translated works have been widely and enthusiastically received in this country. He is recognized as the chief theorist of hermeneutics, a strong and growing movement here in a number of disciplines, from theology and literary criticism to philosophy and social theory.A book in the series Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought.

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From Our Editors

This collection of probing and lucidly written essays shows Gadamer as the leading Continental philosopher after Heidegger. It is an impassioned defense of practical reason, and of hermeneutics as a mode of practical philosophy, against the twin dangers of scientism and ideological partisanship.

From the Publisher

The essays in this book deal broadly with the question of what form reasoning about life and society can take in a culture permeated by scientific and technical modes of thought. They attempt to identify certain very basic types of questions that seem to escape scientific resolution and call for, in Gadamer's view, philosophical reflec...

From the Jacket

This collection of probing and lucidly written essays shows Gadamer as the leading Continental philosopher after Heidegger. It is an impassioned defense of practical reason, and of hermeneutics as a mode of practical philosophy, against the twin dangers of scientism and ideological partisanship.

Shigeru Miyagawa is Professor of Linguistics and Kochi-Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture at MIT. He is the author of Structure and Case Marking in Japanese and the coeditor of Oxford Handbook of Japanese Linguistics.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:214 pages, 7.9 × 5.3 × 0.6 inPublished:September 14, 1983Publisher:The MIT Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0262570610

ISBN - 13:9780262570619

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From Our Editors

This collection of probing and lucidly written essays shows Gadamer as the leading Continental philosopher after Heidegger. It is an impassioned defense of practical reason, and of hermeneutics as a mode of practical philosophy, against the twin dangers of scientism and ideological partisanship.

Editorial Reviews

This is an enchanting set of essays. Gadamer unfolds his perspective on language, reason, and practice through a series of illuminating encounters with Aristotle, Hegel, Heidegger, and Habermas. Our understanding of these thinkers is enhanced even while our comprehension of the distinctive character of Gadamer's thought is nourished. Gadamer's political stance emerges clearly in these essays as well. His forays into science, technology, and ecology provide valuable counterpoints both o the priorities of technocrats and the postulates of critical theory.