Reconstructing Patriarchy after the Great War: Women, Gender, and Postwar Reconciliation between…

Hardcover | May 15, 2008

byErika Kuhlman

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This book, the first to study women's historical involvement in postwar reconciliation, examines how patriarchy and the international relations system operated simultaneously to ensure postwar male privilege.

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This book, the first to study women's historical involvement in postwar reconciliation, examines how patriarchy and the international relations system operated simultaneously to ensure postwar male privilege.

Erika Kuhlman is an Assistant Professor of History at Idaho State University.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:260 pages, 8.35 × 5.71 × 0.74 inPublished:May 15, 2008Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230602819

ISBN - 13:9780230602816

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Table of Contents

American Doughboys and German Fräuleins: Securing Patriarchy and Privilege in the Occupied Rhineland * Imperialism and Postwar Reconciliation: The International and Transnational "Rhineland Horror" Campaign * "What to Do with the Germans?": American Exceptionalism and German-American Reconciliation * Women Activists in the Postwar World: Gender, Reconciliation, and Humanitarian Aid * Binding up "Bitter Wounds": Gender, Nationalism, and Reconciliation on the Home Front in Germany and in the United States

Editorial Reviews

“This study of American and European women’s efforts to shape the peace process in the aftermath of World War I and of gendered conceptions of nations, home fronts, military veterans, former enemies, and memories of the war packs in an immense amount of detailed information. Kuhlman creatively draws on a remarkable range of sources: archival documents from the United States and Germany, newspapers and magazines, cartoons, music, literature, paintings, and scholarship on the war, women’s activism, the postwar occupation of Germany, and topics such as caring. This multidimensional analysis is impressive.”—Peace & Change     “Kuhlman helps us to recognize that peacemaking is not exclusive to policymakers but also involves the process of reconciliation among human beings across and within national borders…With an enormous subject and complex ideas, the clarity and grace of Kuhlman’s work are especially praiseworthy.”—American Historical Review“This book makes an important contribution to our understanding of the postwar period and the extent to which gender played a role in reconstructing peacetime societies. The transnational comparative approach offers a valuable framework for contextualizing gender issues. Kuhlman demonstrates how attempts to restore male dominance were important in both Germany and the United States in creating the postwar order, while simultaneously indicating instances of women’s influence and agency in this process.”—Minerva Journal of Women and War"Kuhlman's transnational perspective broadens our understanding of the role of women activists in the post-war period while also providing original insights into how forces at work on the ground ‘normalized’ civilian life in Germany during that time. The book confirms in many ways the work of earlier scholars of the subject, while moving beyond that work to investigate the success of America in Germany and its reliance upon patriarchal norms to ensure peace. Kuhlman successfully balances the attempts made at reconciliation by some women’s organizations and the ongoing perpetuation of wartime animosities by other groups. By essentially embedding women into the reconciliation process, she reveals both how they attempted to ensure that process but also, in other ways, how they perpetuated disharmony." —Maria Luddy, Professor of History, University of Warwick "The author succeeds admirably in providing her readers with a nuanced and comprehensive understanding of the process of international and domestic reconciliation in the post-war period in Germany and the United States and the complex ways in which the reestablishment of patriarchy was woven into this process... With an enormous subject and complex ideas, the clarity and grace of Kuhlman's work are especially praiseworthy." —Nancy K. Bristow, University of Puget Sound