Recovering The Personal: The Philosophical Anthropology Of William H. Poteat by Dale W. CannonRecovering The Personal: The Philosophical Anthropology Of William H. Poteat by Dale W. Cannon

Recovering The Personal: The Philosophical Anthropology Of William H. Poteat

EditorDale W. Cannon, Ronald L. HallContribution byBruce Haddox

Hardcover | September 14, 2016

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Modernity has radically challenged the assumptions that guide our ordinary lives as persons, in ways we are not normally aware. We live our concrete lives taking for granted that personal decisions, desires, relationships, actions, aspirations, values, and knowledge are central to our existence. But in modernity, we think of these matters as private, idiosyncratic, and subjective, even irrational. This modern conception of ourselves and the associated way of reflection known as modern critical thinking came to dominate our thinking is culminates in the dualistic philosophy of René Descartes. This dualism has spawned a reductionist view of persons and tainted "the personal" with connotations of bias, partiality, and privacy, leaving us with the presumption that if we seek to be objective and intellectually respectable, we must expunge the personal.William H. Poteat's work in philosophical anthropology has confronted this concern head on. He undertakes a radical critique of the various forms of mind-body dualism and materialist monism that have dominated Western intellectual concepts of the person. In a unique style that Poteat calls post-critical, he uncovers the staggering incoherencies of these dualisms and shows how they have resulted in a loss of the personal in the modern age. He also formulates a way out of this modern cultural insanity. This constructive dimension of his thought is centered on his signature concept of the mindbody, the pre-reflective ground of personal existence. The twelve contributors in this collection explore outgrowths and implications of Poteat's thought.Recovering the Personal will be of interest to a broad range of intellectual readers with interests in philosophy, psychology, theology, and the humanities.
Dale W. Cannon is professor emeritus of philosophy and religious studies at Western Oregon University. Ronald L. Hall is professor of philosophy at Stetson University.
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Title:Recovering The Personal: The Philosophical Anthropology Of William H. PoteatFormat:HardcoverDimensions:228 pages, 9.38 × 6.21 × 0.79 inPublished:September 14, 2016Publisher:Lexington BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1498540945

ISBN - 13:9781498540940

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Table of Contents

1.Refinding the Personal Dale W. Cannon and Ronald L. HallPhilosophical Anthropology2.Why Is the Personal So Important? Bruce Haddox and Edward St. Clair3.Being Post-Critical Dale W. Cannon4.Critical Recollection Ronald L. Hall5.The Genealogy of Poteat's Philosophical Anthropology Bruce B. Lawrence6.The Primacy of the Person David W. Rutledge7.Dethroning Epistemology Ronald L. HallTheological Considerations8.Personhood and the Problematic of Christianity James W. Stines9.Incarnational Theology Elizabeth Newman10.Towards a Post-Critical Theology R. Melvin KeiserAesthetic Considerations11.Post-Critical Aesthetics Kieran Cashell12.Paul Cézanne and the Numinous Power of the Real William H. Poteat

Editorial Reviews

This collection of essays, devoted to the philosophy of William H. Poteat, is the first of its kind. Required reading for those concerned with Polanyi and philosophical anthropology, it will also be of interest to anyone concerned with existentialism or phenomenology, or anyone simply curious about where modern philosophy went wrong. Devoted to the personal and the post-critical, the essays are themselves warmly personal, celebrating the life and teaching of professor Poteat as much as his work.