Red Sea Citizens: Cosmopolitan Society And Cultural Change In Massawa

Paperback | July 6, 2009

byJonathan Miran

not yet rated|write a review

In the late 19th century, the port of Massawa, in Eritrea on the Red Sea, was a thriving, vibrant, multiethnic commercial hub. Red Sea Citizens tells the story of how Massawa rose to prominence as one of Northeast Africa's most important shipping centers. Jonathan Miran reconstructs the social, material, religious, and cultural history of this mercantile community in a period of sweeping change. He shows how Massawa and its citizens benefited from migrations across the Indian Ocean, the Arabian peninsula, Egypt, and the African interior. Miran also notes the changes that took place in Massawa as traders did business and eventually settled. By revealing the dynamic processes at play, this book provides insight into the development of the Horn of Africa that extends beyond borders and boundaries, nations and nationalism.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$37.38 online
$39.00 list price
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

In the late 19th century, the port of Massawa, in Eritrea on the Red Sea, was a thriving, vibrant, multiethnic commercial hub. Red Sea Citizens tells the story of how Massawa rose to prominence as one of Northeast Africa's most important shipping centers. Jonathan Miran reconstructs the social, material, religious, and cultural history...

Jonathan Miran is Assistant Professor of Islamic Civilization in the Department of Liberal Studies at Western Washington University.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:400 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 1 inPublished:July 6, 2009Publisher:Indiana University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0253220793

ISBN - 13:9780253220790

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Red Sea Citizens: Cosmopolitan Society And Cultural Change In Massawa

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction: Facing the Land, Facing the Sea
1. Making a Region Between the Sea and the Mountain: Na'ib Autonomy and Dominance, to the 1850s
2. On Camels and Boats: Spaces, Structures and Circuits of Production and Exchange
3. Connecting Sea and Land: Merchants, Brokers, and the Anatomy of a Red Sea Port Town
4. "A Sacred Muslim Island": Sufis, Holy Men, and Town Islam in Massawa and the Interior
5. "Being Massawan": Citizenship, Family, and Urban Authority

Conclusion
Notes
Sources
Index

Editorial Reviews

"[The author] deepens our understanding of...local topics [but] his major contribution lies in the links he draws with much larger historical processes....Miran's work admirably illustrates how attention to transregional empires and larger spatial units can recast the problems that animate a field." -James De Lorenzi, CUNY, John Jay College, Islamic Africa