Reference And Access: Innovative Practices For Archives And Special Collections by Kate TheimerReference And Access: Innovative Practices For Archives And Special Collections by Kate Theimer

Reference And Access: Innovative Practices For Archives And Special Collections

EditorKate Theimer

Paperback | May 22, 2014

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Reference and Access: Innovative Practices for Archives and Special Collections explores how archives of different sizes and types are increasing their effectiveness in serving the public and meeting internal needs. The book features twelve case studies that demonstrate new ways to interact with users to answer their questions, provide access to materials, support patrons in the research room, and manage reference and access processes. The featured case studies are1.Building Bridges: Closing the Divide between Minimally Processed Collections and Researchers2.Managing Risk with a Virtual Reading Room: Two Born-Digital Projects 3.Improvements on a Shoestring: Changing Reference Systems and Processes 4.Twenty-First Century Security in a Twentieth-Century Space: Reviewing, Revising and Implementing New Security Practices in the Reading Room5.Talking in the Night: Exploring Webchats to Serve New Audiences 6.A Small Shop Meets a Big Challenge: Finding Creative Ways to Assist the Researchers of the Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages 7.The Right Tool at the Right Time: Implementing Responsive Reproduction Policies and Procedures8.Going Mobile: Using iPads to Improve the Reading Room Experience 9.Beyond "Trial by Fire": Towards A More Active Approach to Training New Reference Staff10.Access for All: Making Your Archives Website Accessible for People with Disabilities11.No Ship of Fools: A Digital Humanities Collaboration to Enhance Access to Special Collections12.Websites as a Digital Extension of Reference: Creating a Reference and IT Partnership for Web Usability StudiesEach of these case studies deconstructs reference and access services into their essential elements: interacting with people who have questions, providing access to materials that meet researcher needs, assisting researchers as they use materials, and managing the processes needed to support reference and access. The volume will be useful to those working in archives and special collections as well as other cultural heritage organizations, and provides ideas ranging from the aspirational to the immediately implementable. It also provides students and educators in archives, library, and public history graduate programs a resource for understanding the issues driving change in the field today and the kinds of strategies archivists are using to meet these new challenges.
Kate Theimer is the author of the popular blog ArchivesNext and a frequent writer, speaker and commentator on issues related to the future of archives. She is the author of Web 2.0 Tools and Strategies for Archives and Local History Collections and the editor of A Different Kind of Web: New Connections between Archives and Our Users, a...
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Title:Reference And Access: Innovative Practices For Archives And Special CollectionsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:204 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.53 inPublished:May 22, 2014Publisher:Rowman & Littlefield PublishersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0810890917

ISBN - 13:9780810890916

Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction1) Building Bridges: Closing the Divide between Minimally Processed Collections and ResearchersEmily Christopherson and Rachael Dreyer, American Heritage Center2) Managing Risk with a Virtual Reading Room: Two Born-Digital Projects Michelle Light, University of California, Irvine3) Improvements on a Shoestring: Changing Reference Systems and Processes Jackie Couture and Deborah Whalen, Eastern Kentucky University 4) Twenty-First Century Security in a Twentieth-Century Space: Reviewing, Revising and Implementing New Security Practices in the Reading RoomElizabeth Chase, Gabrielle M. Dudley and Sara Logue, Emory University 5) Talking in the Night: Exploring Webchats to Serve New Audiences Gary Brannan, West Yorkshire Archive Service6) A Small Shop Meets a Big Challenge: Finding Creative Ways to Assist the Researchers of the Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages Leanda Gahegan and Gina Rappaport, National Anthropological Archives,Smithsonian Institution7) The Right Tool at the Right Time: Implementing Responsive Reproduction Policies and ProceduresMelanie Griffin and Matthew Knight, University of South Florida8) Going Mobile: Using iPads to Improve the Reading Room Experience Cheryl Oestreicher, Julia Stringfellow and Jim Duran, Boise State University9) Beyond "Trial by Fire": Towards A More Active Approach to Training New Reference StaffMarc Brodsky, Virginia Tech10) Access for All: Making Your Archives Website Accessible for People with DisabilitiesLisa Snider11) No Ship of Fools: A Digital Humanities Collaboration to Enhance Access to Special CollectionsJennie Levine Knies, University of Maryland12) Websites as a Digital Extension of Reference: Creating a Reference and IT Partnership for Web Usability StudiesSara Snyder and Elizabeth Botten, Archives of American ArtAbout the EditorIndex

Editorial Reviews

In the past few decades, vast changes have taken place in archival description, appraisal, and digitization. All of these changes have affected archival reference service. This volume presents pragmatic, real-life models for twenty-first century public services in archives. Workable solutions are presented for reference/processing collaborations in dealing with the implications of MPLP, providing remote access to born digital records in your collections, improving the usability of your archives' website, and other current reference conundrums. Perhaps the greatest value of these case studies is the encouragement each author gives the reader: try this; push the boundaries as we did. Given the general paucity of writing in this area, I hope this timely reader represents the beginning of a renaissance in writing on all aspects of user services in archives!