Reforming the House of Lords: Lessons from Overseas

Hardcover | August 2, 2000

byMeg Russell

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The constitution of Britain is changing rapidly, and the House of Lords is next on the agenda for reform. But whilst Britain takes on many of the features of other countries constitutions, the Lords reform debate remains insular and backward-looking. This book provides an internationalcontext, using material as yet unpublished in the UK. What can we learn from the appointed Canadian Senate, the elected Australian Senate, the German federal Bundesrat, or our other European neighbours? Firmly practical in its approach and aimed at a generalist as well as specialist audience, thisbook opens up the debate.

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The constitution of Britain is changing rapidly, and the House of Lords is next on the agenda for reform. But whilst Britain takes on many of the features of other countries constitutions, the Lords reform debate remains insular and backward-looking. This book provides an internationalcontext, using material as yet unpublished in the U...

Meg Russell is Senior Research Fellow at the Constitution Unit since August 1998. Previously National Womens Officer of the Labour Party and before that parliamentary researcher to Clare Short MP. Also spent several years prior to that as a researcher in academia.

other books by Meg Russell

Format:HardcoverPublished:August 2, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198298315

ISBN - 13:9780198298311

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Table of Contents

IntroductionPart One: Contexts1. Reforming the House of Lords2. Second chambers worldwidePart Two: Seven Second Chambers3. The composition and context of the chamber4. Politics and personalities in the chamber5. Organisation and administration6. The legislative role of the chamber7. Committees and investigative work8. Constitutional and constituency9. Government and the second chamber10. Binding different levels of government together11. Public Perceptions and calls for reformPart Three: Lessons for Lords Reform12. Principles of reform13. The role and functions of the new chamber14. The composition of the new chamberEpilogue: Prospects for reform

Editorial Reviews

`she does a useful job in describing the jobs an Upper House might do, and the membership it might need to do them.' George Wedd, Contemp. Rev. Jan 01.