Religion: A Humanist Interpretation by Raymond FirthReligion: A Humanist Interpretation by Raymond Firth

Religion: A Humanist Interpretation

byRaymond FirthEditorRaymond Firth

Paperback | December 27, 1995

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Religion: A Humanist Interpretationrepresents a lifetime's work on the anthropology of religion from a rather unusual personal viewpoint. Raymond Firth treats religion as a human art, capable of great intellectual and artistic achievements, but also of complex manipulation to serve the human interests of those who believe in it and operate it. His study is comparative, drawing material from a range of religions around the world. Its findings are a challenge to established beliefs.
This anthropological approach to the study of religion covers themes ranging from; religious belief and personal adjustment; gods and God; offering and sacrifice;religion and politics; Malay magic and spirit mediumship; truth and paradox in religion.
Raymond Firth, a New Zealand-born English anthropologist, was Bronislaw Malinowski's successor at the London School of Economics. In 1928 he first visited the tiny island of Tikopia in the Solomons, and his monograph We, the Tikopia (1936) established his fame. A devoted student of Malinowski, he established no school of anthropologica...
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Title:Religion: A Humanist InterpretationFormat:PaperbackDimensions:254 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.8 inPublished:December 27, 1995Publisher:Taylor and Francis

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0415128978

ISBN - 13:9780415128971

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Religion: A Humanist Interpretation represents a lifetime's work on the anthropology of religion from a rather unusual personal viewpoint. Raymond Firth treats religion as a human art, capable of great intellectual and artistic achievements, but also of complex manipulation to serve human interests of those who believe in it and operate it. His study is comparative, drawing material from a range of religions around the world. Its finding are a challenge to established beliefs.