Religion and Community in the New Urban America

Paperback | April 14, 2015

byPaul D. Numrich, Elfriede Wedam

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Religion and Community in the New Urban America examines the interrelated transformations of cities and urban congregations. The authors ask how the new metropolis affects local religious communities and what role those communities play in creating the new metropolis. Through an in-depth studyof fifteen Chicago congregations - Catholic parishes, Protestant churches, Jewish synagogues, Muslim mosques, and a Hindu temple, both city and suburban - this book describes congregational life and measures congregational influences on urban environments. Paul D. Numrich and Elfriede Wedam challenge the view held by many urban studies scholars that religion plays a small role - if any - in shaping postindustrial cities and that religious communities merely adapt to urban structures in a passive fashion. Taking into account the spatial distribution ofconstituents, internal traits, and external actions, each congregation's urban impact is plotted on a continuum of weak, to moderate, to strong, thus providing a nuanced understanding of the significance of religion in the contemporary urban context. Presenting a thoughtful analysis that includesmaps of each congregation in its social-geographic setting, the authors offer an insightful look into urban community life today, from congregations to the places in which they are embedded.

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Religion and Community in the New Urban America examines the interrelated transformations of cities and urban congregations. The authors ask how the new metropolis affects local religious communities and what role those communities play in creating the new metropolis. Through an in-depth studyof fifteen Chicago congregations - Catholic...

Paul D. Numrich is a professor at Methodist Theological School in Ohio and Trinity Lutheran Seminary, and an affiliate research associate with the McNamara Center for the Social Study of Religion at Loyola University Chicago. He researches the social, civic, and theological implications of America's increasing religious diversity. Elfr...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 9.21 × 6.1 × 1.18 inPublished:April 14, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199386854

ISBN - 13:9780199386857

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Table of Contents

Martin D. Stringer: ForewordPreface and AcknowledgementsIntroduction: The New Urban Era and the Religion FactorPart I: Theoretical and Conceptual Framework1. Adding Religion to Chicago's Story2. Community and Congregations in the New MetropolisPart II: Congregational Case Studies3. Neighborhood Parishes and Churches in a Restructuring City4. Area Mosques and Diverse Corridors5. Area Congregations in the City6. Area Congregations in a Suburban Boom Town7. Metro Congregations: A Wider View of the Restructuring MetropolisPart III: Religion's Urban Significance: Chicago and Beyond8. Congregations and Change: Interpreting Religion's Significance in the New MetropolisAfterword: A Case for RepresentativenessAppendix A: Research MethodsAppendix B: QuestionnaireAppendix C: Field Notes on Worship ServicesAppendix D: Protocol for In-Depth Study of Religious CongregationsBibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

"Chicago has always been the epicenter for urban sociology, and now Numrich and Wedam have put religion definitively in the picture. Conceptually adept and ethnographically rich, this book shows us how congregations are shaped by the spaces in which they are located, and how they in turn shapethis constantly evolving city." --Nancy T. Ammerman, Professor of Sociology of Religion, Boston University