Religion And Development: Conflict or Cooperation? by J. HaynesReligion And Development: Conflict or Cooperation? by J. Haynes

Religion And Development: Conflict or Cooperation?

byJ. Haynes

Paperback | October 17, 2007

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Jeffrey Haynes adopts a chronological and conceptual approach to introduce students to the central themes and theoretical perspectives in the study of religion and development in the developing world, focusing on key themes including environmental sustainability, health and education.
JEFFREY HAYNES is Professor of Politics at London Metropolitan University, UK, where he teaches courses on religion, politics, and international relations. He has published widely on international development including Palgrave Advances in Development Studies.
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Title:Religion And Development: Conflict or Cooperation?Format:PaperbackDimensions:250 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.55 inPublished:October 17, 2007Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230542468

ISBN - 13:9780230542464

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Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction: Religion and Development Religious Resurgence, Globalization, and Good Governance Religion and Development: The Ambivalence of the Sacred Conflict, Conflict Resolution and Peace-Building Economic Growth, Poverty and Hunger Environmental Sustainability Health Education Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

While religious fanaticism in the developing world has received extensive scholarly attention in recent years, Haynes offers a more nuanced view that focuses attention on the positive contribution that religious beliefs, institutions, NGOs, and individuals have brought to challenges such as conflict resolution, economic development, and environmental sustainability. A skillful blending of theory and case studies.- Howard Handelman, Emeritus Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA