Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830: RELIGION TOLERATION & BRITISH by Mark CanuelReligion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830: RELIGION TOLERATION & BRITISH by Mark Canuel

Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830: RELIGION TOLERATION & BRITISH

byMark CanuelEditorMarilyn Butler, James Chandler

Paperback | October 20, 2005

Pricing and Purchase Info

$51.71 online 
$52.95 list price
Earn 259 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Mark Canuel examines the way that Romantic poets, novelists and political writers criticized the traditional religious conformity of British political unity. Canuel reveals how writers (including Jeremy Bentham, Ann Radcliffe, Maria Edgeworth and Lord Byron) undermined the validity of religion in the British state, and envisioned a tolerant and more organized mode of social inclusion and protection. He asserts that these writers considered their works to be political and literary commentaries on religious toleration.
Mark Canuel is Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Illinois in Chicago. He has published numerous articles and reviews on Romantic writing.
Justice, Dissent, and the Sublime
Justice, Dissent, and the Sublime

by Mark Canuel

$56.49$70.54

Available for download

Not available in stores

Title:Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830: RELIGION TOLERATION & BRITISHFormat:PaperbackDimensions:328 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.75 inPublished:October 20, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021588

ISBN - 13:9780521021586

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830: RELIGION TOLERATION & BRITISH

Reviews

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Preface; 1. Romanticism and the writing of toleration; 2. 'Holy hypocrisy' and the rule of belief: Radcliffe's gothics; 3. Coleridge's polemic divinity; 4. Sect and secular economy in the Irish national tale; 5. Wordsworth and 'the frame of social being'; 6. 'Consecrated fancy': Byron and Keats; 7. Conclusion: the inquisitorial stage; Selected bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"excellent writing"
Modern Philology