Remapping Second-Wave Feminism: The Long Women's Rights Movement in Louisiana, 1950-1997 by Janet AlluredRemapping Second-Wave Feminism: The Long Women's Rights Movement in Louisiana, 1950-1997 by Janet Allured

Remapping Second-Wave Feminism: The Long Women's Rights Movement in Louisiana, 1950-1997

byJanet Allured

Paper over Board | November 1, 2016

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In Remapping Second-Wave Feminism, Janet Allured attempts to reshape the national narrative by focusing on the grassroots women’s movement in the South, particularly in Louisiana.
Janet Allured is a professor of history at McNeese State University, coeditor of Louisiana Women: Their Lives and Times, Volume I(Georgia) and coeditor of Louisiana Legacies: Readings in the History of the Pelican State.
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Title:Remapping Second-Wave Feminism: The Long Women's Rights Movement in Louisiana, 1950-1997Format:Paper over BoardDimensions:376 pages, 9.25 × 6.25 × 1 inPublished:November 1, 2016Publisher:University Of Georgia PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820345385

ISBN - 13:9780820345383

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Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Deeply researched and masterfully written, Allured’s book provides a compelling argument; feminism had deep roots in southern labor, religious, and civil rights/social justice traditions. Drawing extensively on oral histories and archival sources, and exploring key feminist issues such as ERA, divorce and equity issues, abortion access, and violence against women, Allured proves that southern feminist activists were a diverse group of women claiming varied racial/ethnic and class identities, and sexual orientations who came together to fight for their rights in Louisiana. Allured’s book is an important corrective to histories of feminism that ignore critical activism in the South and reveals that southern feminists were critical grass-roots activists for women’s rights in the last half of the twentieth century. - Megan Taylor Shockley - author of We, Too, Are Americans: African American Women in Detroit and Richmond, 1940–54