Remarks Made On A Tour To Prairie Du Chien; Thence To Washington City, In 1829

Paperback | January 10, 2012

byCaleb Atwater

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1831. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... cities, I concluded, to travel Eastward as far as Boston, making a stop in Philadelphia of a few days as 1 passed onward. Visit to Philadelphia. Leaving Washington, in the stage for Baltimore, I passed over the delightful road between these cities and tarried a few hours at Barnum's, when I took a steam boat, for Philadelphia, by way of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Passing through the canal, and then going on board of another steamer, I was landed at Philadelphia, at sunset, about the middle of October, in 1829. Getting into a carriage, I was soon at the door of a friend, in Ghesnut street, nearly opposite the United States hotel. Here I tarried two weeks or more, after which period, I boarded at Mrs. Swain's, in Eighth, just below Walnut street. During my whole life, I had always, every where fallen into the society of persons, who had been born and educated in Philadelphia: and it is but justice to everyone of them, to say, that if a man, whether he was a professional one--a merchant--a mechanic--a farmer-- or even a hostler, he was a gentleman, in his manners, kind, friendly, polite, amiable and agreeable, in all his intercourse with the world. He was useful to himself, his friends and the public. He thought, for himself, and had not a particle of the sycophant, in his composition. He might dispute with me, all day, or on every day in the year, about some matter, about which we could not think alike, without being angry himself, or making me so. If a female, whether she lived in a palace or a cottage --in splendor or affluence, or sunk low, in the vale of poverty, through some great and undeserved misfortune-- if the mistress of a family, she maintained her station in society, with ease, dignity and propriety, and so far as she could, diffused happiness...

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1831. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... cities, I concluded, to travel Eastward as far as Boston, making a stop in Philadelphia of a few days as 1 passed onward. Visit to Ph...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:106 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.22 inPublished:January 10, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217269028

ISBN - 13:9780217269025

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