Representation and Reality

Paperback | August 28, 1991

byHilary Putnam

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Hilary Putnam, who may have been the first philosopher to advance the notion that the computer is an apt model for the mind, takes a radically new view of his own theory of functionalism in this book. Putnam argues that in fact the computational analogy cannot answer the important questions about the nature of such mental states as belief, reasoning, rationality, and knowledge that lie at the heart of the philosophy of mind.

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Hilary Putnam, who may have been the first philosopher to advance the notion that the computer is an apt model for the mind, takes a radically new view of his own theory of functionalism in this book. Putnam argues that in fact the computational analogy cannot answer the important questions about the nature of such mental states as bel...

Hilary Putnam is Walter Beverly Pearson Professor of Mathematical Logic at Harvard University.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:154 pages, 8.8 × 6 × 0.4 inPublished:August 28, 1991Publisher:The MIT Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0262660741

ISBN - 13:9780262660747

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With striking candor, Putnam exposes the factors that have shaped his thinking about intentionality. Since that thinking has had a great influence, this book is full of valuable insights into current philosophical methods, foibles, and aspirations. As usual, he sets a hard task for his colleagues: figuring out how to agree with just 90 percent of what he says.