Representing the South Pacific: Colonial Discourse from Cook to Gauguin by Rod EdmondRepresenting the South Pacific: Colonial Discourse from Cook to Gauguin by Rod Edmond

Representing the South Pacific: Colonial Discourse from Cook to Gauguin

byRod Edmond

Paperback | October 13, 2005

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This book examines how the South Pacific was represented by explorers, missionaries, travelers, writers and artists between 1767 and 1914. It draws on history, literature, art history, and anthropology in its study of different, often conflicting colonial discourses of the Pacific. Among its themes are the persistent mythmaking around the figure of Cook, the Western obsession with Polynesian sexuality, tattooing, cannibalism and leprosy, the Pacific as a theater for adventure, and as a setting for Europe's displaced fears of its own cultural extinction.
Title:Representing the South Pacific: Colonial Discourse from Cook to GauguinFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:October 13, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521021138

ISBN - 13:9780521021135

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Customer Reviews of Representing the South Pacific: Colonial Discourse from Cook to Gauguin

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. Killing the god: the afterlife of Cook's death; 3. Mutineers and beachcombers; 4. Missionary endeavours; 5. Trade and adventure; 6. 'Taking up with kanakas': Robert Louis Stevenson and the Pacific; 7. Skin and Bones: Jack London's diseased Pacific; 8. The French Pacific; 9. Epilogue.

Editorial Reviews

"...exemplary study...Beyond students of the Pacific, this rich and rewarding study should be of interest to those who follow colonial discourse analysis through its vicissitudes and excesses and welcome sane, historically grounded work in this too fashionable field." Comparative Literature