Resistance To Innovation: Its Sources And Manifestations

Hardcover | June 12, 2015

byShaul Oreg, Jacob Goldenberg

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Every year, about 25,000 new products are introduced in the United States. Most of these products fail—at considerable expense to the companies that produce them. Such failures are typically thought to result from consumers’ resistance to innovation, but marketers have tended to focus instead on consumers who show little resistance, despite these “early adopters” comprising only 20 percent of the consumer population.

Shaul Oreg and Jacob Goldenberg bring the insights of marketing and organizational behavior to bear on the attitudes and behaviors of the remaining 80 percent who resist innovation. The authors identify two competing definitions of resistance: In marketing, resistance denotes a reluctance to adopt a worthy new product, or one that offers a clear benefit and carries little or no risk. In the field of organizational behavior, employees are defined as resistant if they are unwilling to implement changes regardless of the reasons behind their reluctance. Seeking to clarify the act of rejecting a new product from the reasons—rational or not—consumers may have for doing so, Oreg and Goldenberg propose a more coherent definition of resistance less encumbered by subjective, context-specific factors and personality traits. The application of this tighter definition makes it possible to disentangle resistance from its sources and ultimately offers a richer understanding of consumers’ underlying motivations. This important research is made clear through the use of many real-life examples.

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Every year, about 25,000 new products are introduced in the United States. Most of these products fail—at considerable expense to the companies that produce them. Such failures are typically thought to result from consumers’ resistance to innovation, but marketers have tended to focus instead on consumers who show little resistance, de...

Shaul Oreg is associate professor of organizational behavior at the School of Business Administration at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a coeditor of The Psychology of Organizational Change.Jacob Goldenberg is professor of marketing at the Arison School of Business at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, visiting professor...

other books by Shaul Oreg

The Psychology of Organizational Change: Viewing Change from the Employee's Perspective
The Psychology of Organizational Change: Viewing Change...

Kobo ebook|Apr 18 2013

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:208 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.8 inPublished:June 12, 2015Publisher:University Of Chicago PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0226632601

ISBN - 13:9780226632605

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction 

Part I: Sources of Resistance
Chapter 1. It’s Not the Innovation, It’s the Adopter: Why Some People Are More Likely Than Others to Resist 
Chapter 2. What’s in It for Me, and What Do I Have to Lose? Practical Reasons for Resisting Innovation 
Chapter 3. It’s Not What You Introduce, It’s How You Do It: The Process of Innovation Introduction 
Chapter 4. Where and When Is the Innovation Introduced? The Role of Innovation Context in the Emergence of Resistance 

Part II: Resistance Manifestations
Chapter 5. Lagging—Innovation in Disguise 
Chapter 6. Resistance and the Dangers of Negative Word of Mouth 
Chapter 7. The Dual Market Effect 

Epilogue 
Index

Editorial Reviews

“Thousands of new products debut annually. Most are unsuccessful, wasting money and other resources. Researchers have traditionally focused on successful products, but Oreg and Goldenberg point out that concentrating solely on successful innovations can lead to inaccurate conclusions and missed opportunities. Accordingly, Oreg and Goldenberg explore the failed majority and why consumers balked at or rejected them, cautioning that resistance does not necessarily result in product failure. . . . Recommended.”