Resources, Deprivation, and Poverty: Resources Deprivation & Povert

Hardcover | April 30, 1999

byBrian Nolan, Christopher T. Whelan

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Poverty alleviation is a central aim of economic and social policy, and yet there is no consensus about what poverty means or how it is best measured. Often, the households below an income poverty line are counted as poor, but there may be no firm basis for concentrating on that particularincome level. There may also be wide variations among the households below any income poverty line in terms of their actual living standards. This book explores what poverty means in developed countries, and shows that understanding and measuring it requires widening the focus beyond curent income.By using broader measures of resources and information on living patterns and concrete indicators of deprivation, it shows how those who are effectively excluded from participation in society due to a lack of resources can be more accurately identified, and the processes producing such exclusionbetter understood. The core issue of this book is how to define and measure poverty in relatively rich countries in a way which is valid, meaningful in the context, and valuable for policy-making. Extensive tables of data from a specially designed survey of a large representative sample of Irishhouseholds are used to illustrate this issue.

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From the Publisher

Poverty alleviation is a central aim of economic and social policy, and yet there is no consensus about what poverty means or how it is best measured. Often, the households below an income poverty line are counted as poor, but there may be no firm basis for concentrating on that particularincome level. There may also be wide variations...

From the Jacket

Poverty alleviation is a central aim of economic and social policy, and yet there is no consensus about what poverty means or how it is best measured. Often, the households below an income poverty line are counted as poor, but there may be no firm basis for concentrating on that particular income level. There may also be wide variation...

Brian Nolan is a Research Professor at Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin. Christopher T. Whelan is a Research Professor at the Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin.

other books by Brian Nolan

Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 0.83 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198287852

ISBN - 13:9780198287858

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. The Meaning and Measurement of Poverty3. Income Poverty4. Measuring Deprivation5. Income, Resources, and Deprivation6. Income, Deprivation, and Poverty7. Class, Underclass, and Poverty8. Implications for Conceptualizing and Measuring Poverty9. Implications for Tackling Poverty. 10. ConclusionsAppendicesReferencesIndex

Editorial Reviews

`Readers of this journal will be all too familiar with the questions which have bedevilled research on poverty ... This authoritative study makes a significant contribution to these and related questions ... This book should make a significant contribution to the analysis of poverty and socialinequality. It offers a rigorous, ingenious and original contribution to some of the most stubborn methodological problems in recent poverty research ... For the 'professionals' in the poverty research business ... the book is, quite simply, essential reading.'Social Policy, vol.26/2, 1997