Responses to Regionalism in East Asia: Japanese Production Networks in the Automotive Sector by Andrew J. Staples

Responses to Regionalism in East Asia: Japanese Production Networks in the Automotive Sector

byAndrew J. Staples

Hardcover | May 30, 2008

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This book is a timely examination of the impact of deepening regional economic integration and regionalism in East Asia on corporate strategy in the Japanese automotive sector. The book presents new knowledge by drawing on empirical research undertaken with corporate executives, public officials and academics. It offers a cogent analysis of the post-crisis transformation of the region and of Japan's pivotal role within this.

Details & Specs

Title:Responses to Regionalism in East Asia: Japanese Production Networks in the Automotive SectorFormat:HardcoverDimensions:267 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.04 inPublished:May 30, 2008Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230516254

ISBN - 13:9780230516250

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

Introduction * PART 1: THEORY AND APPROACH * Foreign Direct Investment, Regionalism and Japanese Regional Production Networks * PART 2: ESTABLISHING THE CONTEXT * The Transformation of the East Asian Political Economy * Japan and the Transformation of the East Asian Political Economy * PART 3: RESPONSE TO REGIONALISM IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR * Japanese Automotive Manufacturers in East Asia * General Strategy and Investment Response * The Rationalization and Reordering of Production Networks * Japanese FDI in East Asia * Conclusions

Editorial Reviews

"Andrew Staples provides an excellent analysis of Japanese automobile manufacturers in East Asia... The author's accomplishment is particularly noteworthy given that it is extremely difficult to penetrate the insular nature of the Japanese corporation." —Ali M. Nizamuddin, University of Illinois at Springfield