Responsibility and Atonement

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byRichard Swinburne

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According to how we treat others, we acquire merit or guilt, deserve praise or blame, and receive reward or punishment, looking in the end for atonement. In this study distinguished theological philosopher Richard Swinburne examines how these moral concepts apply to humans in their dealingswith each other, and analyzes these findings, determining which versions of traditional Christian doctrines--sin and original sin, redemption, sanctification, and heaven and hell--are considered morally acceptable.

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According to how we treat others, we acquire merit or guilt, deserve praise or blame, and receive reward or punishment, looking in the end for atonement. In this study distinguished theological philosopher Richard Swinburne examines how these moral concepts apply to humans in their dealingswith each other, and analyzes these findings, ...

Richard Swinburne is at University of Oxford.

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Format:PaperbackPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198248490

ISBN - 13:9780198248491

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`By trying to produce a detailed and philosophically coherent account of the atonement which is true to biblical texts and Christian tradition, on the one hand, and our moral intuitions, on the other, Swinburne has done us all a great service. Philosophers and theologians interested in theatonement must grapple with the issues raised by Swinburne's account.'Faith and Philosophy