Rethinking Securities in an Emergent Technoscientific New World Order: Retracing the Contours for Africa's Hi-jacked Futures by Munyaradzi MawereRethinking Securities in an Emergent Technoscientific New World Order: Retracing the Contours for Africa's Hi-jacked Futures by Munyaradzi Mawere

Rethinking Securities in an Emergent Technoscientific New World Order: Retracing the Contours for…

EditorMunyaradzi Mawere, Artwell Nhemachena

Paperback | March 13, 2018

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The emergent technoscientific New World Order is being legitimised through discourses on openness and inclusivity. The paradox is that openness implies vulnerability and insecurities, particularly where closure would offer shelter. While some actors, including NGOs, preach openness of African societies, Africans clamour for protection, restitution and restoration. Africans struggle for ownership and access to housing, for national, cultural, religious, economic, and social belonging that would offer them the necessary security and protection, including protection from the global vicissitudes and matrices of power. In the presence of these struggles, to presuppose openness would be to celebrate vulnerability and insecurities. This book examines ways in which emergent technologies expose Africans and, more generally, peoples of the global south to political, economic, social, cultural and religious shocks occasioned by the coloniality of the global matrices of power. It notes that there is the use – by global elites – of technologies to incite postmodern revolutions designed to compound the vicissitudes and imponderables in the already unsettled lives of people north and south. Particularly targeted by these technologies are African and other governments that do not cooperate in the fulfilment of the interests of the hegemonic global elites. The book is handy to students and practitioners in security studies, African studies, development studies, global studies, policy studies, and political science.

Munyaradzi Mawere holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He is currently professor in the Department of Culture and Heritage Studies at Great Zimbabwe University.Artwell Nhemachena holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from the University of Cape Town in South Africa. He is currently senior le...
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Title:Rethinking Securities in an Emergent Technoscientific New World Order: Retracing the Contours for…Format:PaperbackProduct dimensions:428 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.87 inShipping dimensions:9 × 6 × 0.87 inPublished:March 13, 2018Publisher:African Books CollectiveLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9956764116

ISBN - 13:9789956764112

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1. The Development of (Neo-)Imperial Sacrifice, Global Atavism and African Insecurities

Chapter 2. “Ethnicity”, “Nomadic” Identities and  (In-)Securities in Africa: The Case of the Tsonga Speaking People in South Africa

Chapter 3. Disabilities and Human Insecurities: Women and Oculocutaneous Albinism in Post-Colonial Zimbabwe

Chapter 4. A Religious Survey of Technological Oddity: Humanoid as a Case Study

Chapter 5. The Vacuity of the Responsibility to Protect in Africa? Insecurities and Social Protection in Zimbabwe

Chapter 6. Entangled in the “New World Order”: Africa’s (In-) Security Quandaries and Prospects

Chapter 7. Rethinking Security and Global Politics:  The Tethering of Africa in an era of Globalisation

Chapter 8. United Nations Agencies and Management  of Humanitarian Crisis of Internally  Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Nigeria’s  Abuja Camps: Reflections on the Security of  Igbo Migrants in the North (2010-2016)

Chapter 9. Religions and Insecurities: Heritage Contestations and Religious Praxis in Mberengwa and Masvingo, Zimbabwe

Chapter 10. Electoral Politics and (In-) Securities in Africa: Thinking the past and the present for the future of Africa

Chapter 11. Espousing Global “Civilisation” in “Social Networking”: Linguistic Vulnerability and Techno-paranoia among Tshivenda/Xitsonga Speakers in Zimbabwe

Chapter 12. Zimbabwean Youths and the Insecurities from “Bronco” Abuse

Chapter 13. Democracy, Political Dynamics and (In-)security in the Global South: Hard Lessons for Africans

Chapter 14. The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility  in Curbing Insecurity in Nigeria’s Niger Delta Region

Chapter 15. Should the West Keep on Playing God? Genetic Engineering, Bio-technological Insecurities and their Implications for Africa

Chapter 16. Freedom to Become Insecure? Vulnerabilities from the Emergent Digital Media in Zimbabwe