Revolutionary France: 1788-1880 by Malcolm CrookRevolutionary France: 1788-1880 by Malcolm Crook

Revolutionary France: 1788-1880

EditorMalcolm Crook

Paperback | November 15, 2001

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The French Revolution of 1789 was followed by a century of upheaval, rebellion, and change. Napoleonic dictatorship, monarchical restoration, Second Republic, and Second Empire all rapidly succeeded one another, and it was not until the advent of the Third Republic in the 1870s that politicalstability was restored. The period 1788-1880 thus possesses a unity as Revolutionary France, though it is seldom treated as a whole. In this volume, a team of leading international historians explore the major issues of politics and society, together with the dynamics of culture, gender, nationalidentity, and overseas empire, during this vital period of French history.
Malcolm Crook is Professor of French History at Keele University. He has served as Secretary to The Society for the Study of French History and has recently succeeded Professor Richard Bonney as Editor of the associated OUP journal, French History. He has taught at Keele University since 1972.
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Title:Revolutionary France: 1788-1880Format:PaperbackDimensions:262 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.55 inPublished:November 15, 2001Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198731876

ISBN - 13:9780198731870

Reviews

Table of Contents

Malcolm Crook: Introduction1. Malcolm Crook: The French Revolution and Napoleon, 1788-18142. Pamela Pilbeam: Upheaval and Continuity, 1814-18803. Thomas Kselman: Religious Belief4. Elinor Accampo: Class and Gender5. Peter McPhee: Town and Country6. Robert Gildea: Province and Nation7. Michael Heffernan: France and the Wider WorldMalcolm Crook: ConclusionFurther ReadingChronologyMaps

Editorial Reviews

This book nicely introduces the reader to the historio-political but also the socio-cultural processes during the French revolution. Dr Andrea Beckmann, Lecturer in Criminology, Dept. Policy Studies, University of Lincoln